2005 Legislative Report on Children and Youth

Oklahoma Insiitute for Child Advocacy
Anne Roberts
March 27, 2006
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2005 Legislative Report on Children and Youth
By Anne Roberts
The CHILD Advocate
A Publication of the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy
2
B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s
President
Kimberly Francisco, Oklahoma City
President-Elect
Dean Stringer, Oklahoma City
VP Development
Caroline Linehan,Oklahoma City
VP Development
Ron Rocke, Oklahoma City
VP Directors
Linda Dzialo, Ph.D.,Lawton
Secretary/Treasurer
Anne Calvert, Oklahoma City
Lisa Barrowman, Oklahoma City
Bill Doenges, Tulsa
Doug Fox, Tulsa
Terry D. Harryman, Oklahoma City
Lyn Hester, Oklahoma City
Dianne Juhnke, Enid
Jay Keel, Ada
Ed Legako, M.D., Lawton
Bob McCormick, Stillwater
Peggy McCormick, Stillwater
D. Kent Meyers, Oklahoma City
Ben H. Robinson, Muskogee
Thad Satterfield, Bartlesville
Roger Sheldon, M.D., Oklahoma City
Cindy Shuberg, Oklahoma City
Ken Young, Oklahoma City
Executive Director
Anne Roberts
Notes on the Bill Board and Voting Record
The Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA)
is a non-partisan, independent voice for Oklahoma’s
children and youth. Each year, OICA keeps track of
legislation concerning children through our subscription
service, the Children’s Information Network (CIN), and
publishes the voting records of Oklahoma State House
and Senate members on key measures affecting children
and youth.
The vote tabulations found on pages 8-11 are for
information purposes only and do not reflect endorsement or
censure of any legislator on the basis of his or her record.
Many of the bills were complex, and may foster divergent
positions among child advocates both in and out of the
Legislature. Readers are encouraged to contact their Senator
or House Member to increase their understanding of a
particular bill and reasons for their votes.
420 NW 13th, Suite 101
OKC, Oklahoma 73103
Phone 405/236-KIDS
F a x 4 0 5 / 2 3 6 - K I D X
email: aroberts@oica.org
The CHILD Advocate is a publication of the
Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy
(OICA). The mission of OICA is to raise
awareness, take action and change policy on
behalf of Oklahoma’s children and youth.
3
History in the Making
The 2005 Oklahoma Legislative Session was historic in many
respects.| Term limits created the largest class of freshmen legislators
since reapportionment in 1965, including 39 new House
Members and 15 new Senate members.| Republicans became the majority party in the House of
Representatives for the first time in 80 years, and rewrote
the operations manual for conducting business.| The Senate changed leaders in mid-stream, with Cal Hobson
stepping down and Senator Mike Morgan taking over as Pro
Tem.
Impact on Priorities
These changes in the make-up and operations of the
Legislature, along with changes in Oklahoma’s economy, had a
tremendous impact on the priorities and issues considered by
lawmakers.| The largest tax cut in state history was enacted.| Major health care initiatives were included in a bipartisan
agreement.| The first significant pro-life legislation in several decades
became law.
Unexpected Influences
Other events grabbed headlines and spurred legislative
response.| Congress greatly reduced the amount of federal funds
coming in to Oklahoma’s Medicaid program to provide
health care to poor children, pregnant women, and the
elderly.| A critical audit of the Office of Juvenile Affairs released in
mid-Session forced changes in the law to correct identified
problems.| A federal court order was handed down just one week before
the end of Session ordering the Oklahoma Health Care
Authority to raise reimbursement rates for providers of
children’s medical services. This compelled lawmakers to
provide additional funds for this purpose on the very last day
of Session.
In spite of all these changes and influences, the job of child
advocates remained the same: to educate lawmakers about the
needs of children and youth, and push for needed funding and
reforms. While the task was more challenging than usual,
advocates scored major victories for the health and well-being
of Oklahoma’s most vulnerable populations.
V I C T O R I E S
Child Nutrition and Physical Activity
Poor nutritional habits and sedentary lifestyles have created a
crisis in childhood obesity, causing alarming health problems
in children and adolescents. To address this issue, lawmakers
enacted three measures to help our schools create an
environment that promotes healthy habits in Oklahoma
students. SB 265 limits access to foods of low-nutritional value
in schools. SB 312 requires 60 minutes per week of physical
education in grades K-5, and requires Middle and High
Schools to offer physical education as an elective. HB 1647
directs the State Board of Education to establish the “Walk
Across Oklahoma” physical education program for 5th graders.
Access to Health Care
Multiple reforms were passed to increase access to health care
for low-income Oklahoma children and families. In October,
the federal Medicaid matching rate for Oklahoma will drop by
2.27% (fourth largest cut in the nation) - meaning a loss of
over $55 million to vital health services. So a major victory
came with the appropriation of state funds to cover these
losses. Other measures include:| A new system for prescription drug assistance| Establishment of health savings accounts| Incentives to attract providers to under-served rural areas| Expansion of community health centers| Funding 12-month Medicaid eligibility| Increasing provider reimbursement rates for all physicians
and hospitals
Investment in Education
Just three years ago, Oklahoma suffered one of the most severe
revenue shortfalls in state history, resulting in devastating
budget cuts to state agencies. One of the priorities for the 2005
Children’s Agenda was to restore funding to vital programs and
services to pre-shortfall levels. With the passage of HB 1020,
lawmakers provided $2.15 billion for public schools,
representing an increase of over $145 million from last year.
This restores $500,000 to the Parents as Teachers Program to
fund services to an additional 1,500 children. It further
restores $1.6 million to Alternative Education and Drop-Out
Recovery, to assist students who have not succeeded in the
traditional classroom setting.
2005 Legislative Update
4
Early Childhood Issues
Child advocates claimed two major accomplishments for young
children and their families: funding for the child care subsidy
program and for full-day kindergarten.
Child Care Subsidy: The Department of Human Services
received $15 million for the continuation of its nationallyacclaimed
child care subsidy program, averting a potential
crisis that threatened to push children of low-income working
families into substandard, unlicensed care.
Full-Day Kindergarten: Research indicates that full-day
kindergarten programs produce both academic and financial
payoffs, reducing the likelihood that students would have to
repeat a grade, and increasing their scores on standardized
reading and math tests. More than 70% of Oklahoma school
districts already offer the program, but without additional
compensation. The Legislature provided $21.6 million to the
State Department of Education to fund full-day programs, and
to provide an incentive to implement it in other districts.
Children’s Mental Health
The Systems of Care approach has become the “best practice”
model for providing comprehensive mental health services to
children and young people with serious emotional disturbance
and their families. The outcome for these youngsters has been
extremely gratifying: among the first 261 Oklahoma children
to complete the six months of treatment, there was a 75%
decrease in arrests, and the cost of out-of-home placements,
such as foster care and inpatient psychiatric treatment
decreased by 61%. In order to continue and expand this
successful program, the legislature appropriated $1 million to
the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
Services.
Juvenile Justice
The budget cuts of the past three years hit the Office of Juvenile
Affairs particularly hard, causing the near elimination of
programs to track and assist juveniles exiting custody, and
reducing staffing levels at institutions. Employees at Rader
Center have been assaulted by their juvenile charges, and a
deteriorating fence has allowed multiple escapes. Added to this
was the mid-April release of a derogatory audit of OJA’s oversight
of contracted services. Legislators responded with the resources
necessary to address all of these concerns, providing funds for
capital improvements, including a new perimeter fence, rate
increases for detention centers, and funds for additional group
home beds. Funds were also provided to the Oklahoma Military
Department to reinstate the statewide juvenile tracking
program. Finally, $488,000 was provided to establish a contract
management and oversight division within OJA.
D E F E A T S
Prevention of Youth Access to Alcohol
Binge drinking on high school and college campuses has
become a customary activity with deadly consequences. Even
though it is illegal to provide 3.2 beer to minors, it occurs with
alarming frequency. In order to curb underage drinking,
advocates supported the creation of the Prevention of Youth
Access to Alcohol Act, which was introduced through HB 1706.
Components of the bill targeted all parties involved - the
owners, the servers and the minors – placing graduated
penalties on each group. The bill was vehemently opposed by
the various “owner” groups: restaurants, convenience stores
and bars. HB 1706 was defeated in committee. A companion
Senate bill, SB 666, then became the vehicle for our language,
but it, too, was defeated in the same committee. One small
piece of the overall bill was passed in SB 518, which prohibits
happy hours and drown nights in establishments that cater to
people under 21. In the end, the authors passed SCR 29,
creating a Joint Legislative Committee on Underage Drinking
to study the issue and make recommendations for next year.
N O T A D D R E S S E D
Substance Abuse Treatment
Adolescent substance abuse treatment has been nearly nonexistent
in Oklahoma. Yet the Youth Risk Behavior Survey
indicates that almost half of Oklahoma high school students
are using alcohol, and 34% reported episodic binge drinking.
The Children’s Agenda supported the budget request for the
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for
$2.5 million for adolescent substance abuse treatment, but this
item was not funded. However, at the end of the Session,
lawmakers passed SB 126, authorizing the Department to
accept a donation from a community leader in southeastern
Oklahoma to construct a treatment facility for youngsters.
Juvenile Drug Courts
Another promising tool in the battle against youthful
substance abuse is the Juvenile Drug Court. This program
began in Oklahoma in 1997 and, even though it has been
successful, the program has remained small – serving fewer
than 130 young people. The Children’s Agenda supported the
budget request for $1 million to expand the program, but this
item was not funded. (The legislature provided $8 million for
adult drug courts – attesting to their understanding of its
impact: significant reductions in crime and fewer tax dollars
spent on incarceration). On a bright note, however, the
Legislature did pass HB 1405, which standardizes criteria and
operations for the Juvenile Drug Court programs in Oklahoma.
5
Child Abuse Prevention
In 2004, the Department of Human Services confirmed over
12,000 cases of child abuse and neglect in Oklahoma. Even
though our state has several effective models of parent
education and support to address this problem, the revenue
shortfalls of the past few years have diminished their capacity
to serve at-risk families. The Children’s Agenda sought
additional funding for these programs, but none was
forthcoming. The lone exception was the $500,000
appropriated to the Department of Education for the Parents
as Teachers program.
Child Welfare
On any given day, there are more than 6,800 children in foster
care in Oklahoma, representing a 16% increase from a year
ago. The emergency shelters run by the Department of Human
Services in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City are continually
operating well above capacity. The need for more foster
families grows daily. The Children’s Agenda supported the
DHS budget request for additional funding for foster care and
adoption subsidies, but these items were not funded.
Teen Pregnancy Prevention
Even though teen birth rates have been declining, Oklahoma
still ranks far above the national average. Early child bearing is
keeping too many young Oklahomans from completing their
education, building job skills, and developing stable family
relationships. The Children’s Agenda supported the budget
request of the State Department of Health for additional funds
for its community-based teen pregnancy prevention projects,
but no funding was made available.
U N K N O W N S
With so many needs crying out for additional funding, it is
puzzling that lawmakers would enact the largest tax cut in
state history rather than address these serious issues. Besides
the lack of funds for programs to children and youth described
above, other state services went lacking. The Department of
Corrections is dangerously understaffed, and there Department
of Human Services reports 4,200 people with developmental
disabilities on their waiting list to receive services. It is true
that state revenue collections are at historically high levels, yet
they are the result of high oil and gas prices that will surely
decline. It remains to be seen how state services will be
sustained with the inevitable downturn in revenue in
coming years.
C O N C L U S I O N
For the children and youth of Oklahoma, the Legislative
Session was a mixed bag. Significant victories were won, yet
many important priorities were soundly defeated, and some
not even considered. Of the measures on the 2005 Legislative
Agenda for Children and Youth, we made progress on eight of
the ten items, leaving much work to be done next year!
Underage Drinking
HB 1706 and SB 666 (Balkman/Rabon)
Would have created the Prevention of Youth Access to Alcohol
Act, enhancing penalties to minors who possess 3.2 beer, to
the clerks and waiters who serve 3.2 beer to minors, and to
the owners of establishments who provide 3.2 beer to minors.
SB 518 (Wilcoxson/Balkman)
Prohibits “happy hours” and “drown nights” whereby persons
sell 3.2 beer at a reduced price, or all-you-can-drink beer for a
set price.
SCR 29 (Rabon/Balkman)
Creates the Joint Interim Committee on Underage Drinking
to study the current public and private efforts to combat
underage drinking, evaluate their effectiveness, and make
recommendations to the Legislature.
Juvenile Drug Courts
HB 1405 (Young/Crutchfield)
Standardizes operations for Juvenile Drug Courts. Adds
juvenile drug court as an option for deferred adjudication
in delinquency proceedings and establishes criteria
for eligibility. Juvenile Drug Court is an integrated team
approach that combines the power of the justice system with
the intervention of mental health and substance abuse
professionals. The benefits are many: significant reductions in
crime, diverting young people away from a costly jail
sentence, and placing them back on the path to productivity.
Children’s Mental Health
HB 1084 (Benge/Morgan)
Appropriates $1 million to the Department of Mental Health
and Substance Abuse Services for the Systems of Care model,
which provides an organized and comprehensive array of
services for children with mental illness within their own
communities and schools. This “best practice” model has
proven successful in reducing hospitalizations, reducing the
days of school suspension, and improving the outcomes for
children and their families.
6
2 0 0 5 B i l l
Health and Health Care
SB 265 (Cain/Winchester)
For elementary students, eliminates access to foods and
beverages of no or low nutritional value, except for special
occasions. For middle and junior high students, requires that
only healthy choices, except diet soda, be accessible during
the day, and limits access to foods of no or low nutritional
value to after school and evening events, except for special
occasions. For high school students, requires the availability
of some healthy choices.
SB 312 (Cain/Winchester)
Requires schools to offer physical education instruction for
students at all levels. Requires K-5 to have a minimum of 60
minutes average per week of physical activity.
HB 1647 (Winchester/Lawler)
Requires Board of Education to establish the “Walk Across
America” program for 5th graders.
HB 1088 (Benge/Morgan)
Appropriates $63 million to the Oklahoma Health Care
Authority to increase provider rates for physicians and
hospitals. Federal matching funds will increase the total to
over $200 million.
Health Care Initiative
SB 547 (Adelson/Steele)
Creates a Smart Card System allowing consumers to have
access to all participating prescription drug manufacturer
discount programs.
HB 1411 (Cox/Paddack)
Creates the Physician Assistant Scholarship Program to recruit
more practitioners to rural and medically-underserved areas.
HB 1848 (Steele/Laughlin)
Creates the Health Saving Account Act as an alternative to
traditional health insurance.
HB 1853 (Steele/Adelson)
Creates the Rx for Oklahoma Act, to establish a statewide
program to increase access to prescription drugs.
7
Early Childhood Issues
HB 1094 (Benge/Morgan)
Appropriates $15 million to the Department of Human
Services for the Child Care Subsidy Program that provides
low-income working families access to affordable, quality child
care. Parents of approximately 47,000 Oklahoma children
depend upon subsidized child care as a condition of working
and becoming self-sufficient.
HB 1020 (Benge/Morgan)
Appropriates $21.6 million to the Department of Education to
fund Full- Day (six-hour) Kindergarten. This changes the state
aid formula for full-day programs from 1.3 to 1.5. SB 982, the
Achieving Classroom Excellence Act of 2005, provides for
phasing in implementation of full-day kindergarten until
2011. HB 1020 also appropriates an additional $500,000 for
the Parents as Teachers Program, to help parents lay the
foundation for school success and minimize
developmental problems.
Alternative Education
HB 1020 (Benge/Morgan)
Education is critical to obtaining and maintaining
employment, yet one of every four (25%) students in
Oklahoma who starts high school as a freshman disappears
from the roster prior to graduation. The Alternative Education
Academies have been remarkably successful in serving
students in grades 6-12 at risk of dropping out of school. HB
1020 appropriates an additional $1.6 million to restore some
of the funds cut from the program during the economic
downturn of FY 2002.
Childhood Safety
SB 799 (Jolley/Balkman)
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading killer of children under
14. Current Oklahoma law requires children under 6 to be
restrained in a child safety seat. In 2002, 29 children under
14 were killed and another 3,722 were injured. SB 799
increases the fines for violating the Child Passenger Restraint
law, and earmarks the funds for safety education, administered
through the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office.
HB 1653 (Morgan, D./Leftwich)
Creates a graduated driver license for teenagers that restricts
their driving to the hours of 5 am to 11 pm, with exceptions
for driving to work, school, church or related activities, or if a
licensed driver over the age of 21 is seated next to the
teenager. The bill also prevents teenage drivers from
“cruising” with carloads of their friends – a step that reduced
teen crash fatalities by 27% when a similar law was enacted in
North Carolina.
Child Welfare
SB 733 (Lawler/Terrill)
Oklahoma has more than 113,000 children living in
households headed by grandparents or other relatives. The
reasons for these arrangements are due to a variety of
situations, including substance abuse, illness and death, abuse
and neglect, economic hardship, incarceration, divorce,
domestic violence or other family crises. SB 733 provides
support for these grandparents by engaging them in the court
process and connecting them with services offered by the
Department of Human Services.
Juvenile Justice
HB 1096 (Benge/Morgan)
Appropriates $98.3 million to the Office of Juvenile Affairs, an
increase of $5.5 million over last year. This includes $778,000
for 24 new group home beds for juveniles with serious mental
health and/or substance abuse issues and $178,000 for mental
health screenings for juvenile in custody. The Legislature also
appropriated $1.6 million to the Oklahoma Military
Department to reinstate the statewide juvenile tracking
program for young people returning home from state custody.
Moneys were also provided to make critical capital repairs to
juvenile facilities, including the purchase of a new perimeter
fence at L.E. Rader Center.
B o a r d
Health and Fitness
SB 265
SB 312
Underage Drinking
SB 518
Drug Courts
HB 1405
Mental Health
HB1084
Child Care
HB 1094
Education
HB 1020
Safety
SB 799
Child Welfare
SB 733
Juvenile Justice
HB 1096
For
Against
Absent
8
District
Name
Representatives
OICA Position Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
75 ADKINS, Dennis (R) Y Y N Y O Y Y Y Y Y 8 1 1
63 ARMES, Don (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
50 ASKINS, Jari (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
86 AUFFET, John (D) Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 8 2 0
45 BALKMAN, Thad (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
101 BANZ, Gary (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
68 BENGE, Chris (R) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
42 BILLY, Lisa (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
30 BINGMAN, Brian (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
88 BLACKBURN, Debbie (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y O 8 1 1
61 BLACKWELL, Gus (R) Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
52 BRADDOCK, David (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
3 BRANNON, Neil (D) Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
4 BROWN, Mike (D) N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 7 3 0
94 CALVEY, Kevin (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
21 CAREY, John (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
96 CARGILL, Lance (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
95 CASE, Bill (R) Y Y N Y O O Y Y Y Y 7 1 2
64 COODY, Ann (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
39 COOKSEY, Marian (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
57 COVEY, James (D) N Y N Y Y Y Y N Y Y 7 3 0
5 COX, Doug (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
85 DANK, Odilia (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
33 DENNEY, Lee (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
31 DEPUE, Dale (R) O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
62 DEUTSCHENDORF, Abe (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N 7 3 0
38 DEWITT, Dale (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
65 DORMAN, Joe (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
35 DUNCAN, Rex (R) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
6 EDDINS, Joe (D) Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
1 ELLIS, Jerry (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 9 1 0
72 GILBERT, Darrell (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 9 1 0
7 GLENN, Larry (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 9 1 0
89 HAMILTON, Rebecca (D) O Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y N 7 1 2
Y=For N=Against O=Absent 2005 KIDS REPORT
9
Representatives
Y=For N=Against O=Absent
District
Name
Health and Fitness
SB 265
SB 312
Underage Drinking
SB 518
Drug Courts
HB 1405
Mental Health
HB1084
Child Care
HB 1094
Education
HB 1020
Safety
SB 799
Child Welfare
SB 733
Juvenile Justice
HB 1096
For
Against
Absent
OICA Position Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
18 HARRISON, Terry (D) Y Y O O Y Y Y Y Y N 7 1 2
79 HASTINGS, Chris (R) Y O N Y O O Y Y Y Y 6 1 3
58 HICKMAN, Jeff (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
29 HIETT, Todd (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
22 HILLIARD, Wes (D) Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
49 HYMAN, Terry (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
34 INGMIRE, Terry (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
40 JACKSON, Mike (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
27 JETT, Shane (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
59 JOHNSON, Rob (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
9 JONES, Tad (R) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
84 KERN, Sally (R) O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
28 KIESEL, Ryan (D) Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y N 8 1 1
66 LAMONS, Lucky (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
82 LIEBMANN, Guy (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
93 LINDLEY, Al (D) Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y N 8 1 1
77 LIOTTA, Mark (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
10 MARTIN, Steve (R) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
17 MASS, Mike (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y N Y N 7 3 0
51 McCARTER, Ray (D) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y N 7 3 0
78 MCDANIEL, Jeannie (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
55 MCMULLEN, Ryan (D) O N N O Y Y Y Y Y N 5 3 2
13 MCPEAK, Jerry (D) N N Y Y Y Y O N Y O 5 3 2
46 MILLER, Doug (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
81 MILLER, Ken (R) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
15 MILLER, Ray (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y N Y N 7 3 0
32 MORGAN, Danny (D) Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
83 MORGAN, Fred (R) Y Y Y Y O Y O Y Y Y 8 0 2
92 MORRISSETTE, Richard (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 9 1 0
90 NANCE, John (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
44 NATIONS, Bill (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
37 NEWPORT, Jim (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
69 PERRY, Fred (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y 9 1 0
70 PETERS, Ron (R) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
67 PETERSON, Pam (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
80 PETERSON, Ron (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
OICA Position Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N
2005 KIDS REPORT
10
Y=For N=Against O=Absent
District
Name
Health and Fitness
SB 265
SB 312
Underage Drinking
SB 518
Drug Courts
HB 1405
Mental Health
HB1084
Child Care
HB 1094
Education
HB 1020
Safety
SB 799
Child Welfare
SB 733
Juvenile Justice
HB 1096
For
Against
Absent
Representatives
OICA Position Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
48 PIATT, Greg (R) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O Y 8 1 1
25 PLUNK, Bob (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
19 PRUETT, R. C. (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
91 REYNOLDS, Mike (R) N Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
56 RICHARDSON, Phil (R) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
20 ROAN, Paul (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
41 ROGGOW, Curt (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
12 ROUSSELOT, Wade (D) Y Y N O Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 1 1
97 SHELTON, Mike (D) Y O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 8 1 1
8 SHERRER, Ben (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
16 SHOEMAKE, Jerry (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
73 SHUMATE, Jabar (D) Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y N 8 1 1
74 SMALIGO, John Jr. (R) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
2 SMITHSON, Glen Bud (D) Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
14 STAGGS, Barbara (D) O N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 1 1
26 STEELE, Kris (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
71 SULLIVAN, Daniel (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O Y 9 0 1
36 SWEEDEN, Joe (D) Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y O 8 1 1
53 TERRILL, Randy (R) Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
100 THOMPSON, Mike (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
23 TIBBS, Sue (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
99 TOURE, Opio (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N 9 1 0
98 TREBILCOCK, John (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O Y 9 0 1
24 TURNER, Dale (D) N Y N Y Y O Y Y Y N 6 3 1
60 WALKER, Purcy (D) Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y O 8 0 2
54 WESSELHOFT, Paul (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
11 WILT, Mike (R) N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 2 0
47 WINCHESTER, Susan (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
87 WORTHEN, Trebor (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
76 WRIGHT, John (R) N Y N Y Y N Y Y Y Y 7 3 0
43 YOUNG, Ray (R) Y O Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y 8 1 1
2005 KIDS REPORT
11
Senators
Y=For N=Against O=Absent
District
Name
Health and
Fitness
SB 265
SB 312
Underage
Drinking
SB 518
Drug Courts
HB 1405
Mental Health
HB1084
Child Care
HB 1094
Education
HB 1020
Safety
SB 799
Child Welfare
SB 733
Juvenile
Justice
HB 1096
For
Against
Absent
2005 KIDS REPORT
OICA Position Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
33 ADELSON, Tom (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
42 ALDRIDGE, Cliff (R) N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O 7 2 1
19 ANDERSON, Patrick (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y 9 1 0
31 BARRINGTON, Don (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
32 BASS, Randy (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
40 BRANAN, Cliff (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
34 BROGDON, Randy (R) N N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y 7 3 0
46 CAIN, Bernest, Jr. (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
26 CAPPS, Gilmer (D) O O Y O Y O Y Y O Y 5 0 5
28 COATES, Harry (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
30 COFFEE, Glenn (R) Y Y Y Y Y O Y O Y Y 8 0 2
4 CORN, Kenneth (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
39 CRAIN, Brian A. (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
14 CRUTCHFIELD, Johnnie (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
18 EASLEY, Mary (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O 8 1 1
11 EASON MCINTYRE, Judy (D) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
12 FISHER, Ted (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
29 FORD, John (R) N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 1 0
9 GARRISON, Earl (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
6 GUMM, Jay Paul (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y 9 0 1
10 HARRISON, J. Berry (D) Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
16 HOBSON, Cal (D) Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
22 JOHNSON, Mike (R) N Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y 7 3 0
41 JOLLEY, Clark (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
23 JUSTICE, Ron (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
38 KERR, Robert M. (D) Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
47 LAMB, Todd (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
17 LASTER, Charles (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
27 LAUGHLIN, Owen (R) N N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y 7 3 0
24 LAWLER, Daisy (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y 9 0 1
44 LEFTWICH, Debbe (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
7 LERBLANCE, Richard (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
25 MAZZEI, Mike (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
48 MONSON, Angela (D) Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 9 0 1
21 MORGAN, Mike (D) O O Y O O Y Y Y O Y 5 0 5
20 MYERS, David (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
15 NICHOLS, Jonathan (R) N Y Y O Y Y Y Y Y Y 8 1 1
13 PADDACK, Susan (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
36 PRUITT, Scott (R) Y Y Y Y O O Y Y Y O 7 0 3
5 RABON, Jeff (D) N N Y Y Y Y Y O Y Y 7 2 1
43 REYNOLDS, Jim (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
37 RILEY, Nancy (R) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
8 SHURDEN, Frank (D) N Y Y Y O O Y N Y Y 6 2 2
2 TAYLOR, Stratton (D) N Y O Y Y Y Y O Y Y 7 1 2
45 WILCOXSON, Kathleen (R) Y O Y Y O Y O N Y Y 6 1 3
35 WILLIAMSON, James (R) Y Y Y Y O Y O Y Y Y 8 0 2
3 WILSON, Jim (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
1 WYRICK, Charles (D) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y 10 0 0
420 NW 13th Street
OKC, OK 73103
NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE
P A I D
PERMIT NO. 742
OKLAHOMA CITY, OK
Mark Your Calendars now for the
Annual Fall Forum
on Children's Issues
Tuesday and Wednesday,
October 11-12, 2005
University of Central Oklahoma
Edmond, Oklahoma

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