California Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard

November 1, 2002

Page 2 I N T RODUCTION
Violence against youth is a serious public health problem in
California. Youth between the ages of 12 and 17 are nearly
three times more likely than adults to be victims of serious
violent crime.1 More than 300 of California?s youth each
year are lost to assault and suicide, making violence the
number one killer of kids.2 In a single year in California,
nearly 6,000 young people are hospitalized as a result of a
violent injury, including assault, child abuse, domestic
violence and rape.3
?Choices for Youth: A Public Education Campaign to
Prevent Violence Against Youth,? funded by a grant to
i.e. communications, LLC from The California Wellness
Foundation, is working to inform policymakers, opinion
leaders and the general public about the need to increase
California?s investment in programs to prevent violence
against youth. The ?Choices for Youth? campaign has conducted two statewide voter polls and numerous youth-to-youth
surveys on the subject of youth violence. In the surveys, voters and youth agree that violence is preventable ? if we can
provide youth with positive choices, such as good schools, job training, enrichment programs and mentoring.
Policymakers at the state and local levels have responded to violence against youth by increasing public investments in
programs that provide positive alternatives for youth. In the past few years, the State of California has annually
allocated more than $116 million to county-level violence prevention programs and $121 million to after-school
programs.4 In addition, many new alliances and public/private partnerships have been formed at the local level to provide
support for youth.
It is clear that both the general public and policymakers care about the health and safety of our youth.5 ?Choices for Youth?
believes that we can improve our efforts to prevent violence by assessing how safe youth are, and by evaluating the
resources now being deployed to provide youth with positive choices. The Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard is an
analysis of youth safety and youth resources in 15 counties representing over 80 percent of the state?s youth population.
Note that while some conclusions are offered in the form of rankings and grades, we do not intend to criticize. To the contrary,
our goal in publishing the Scorecard is to provide individuals and organizations who interact with youth (including county and
city government, schools, law enforcement, health and mental health agencies, and other public and private service providers)
with a better understanding of the challenges facing our youth, and of violence-prevention resources and strategies that are
being applied in today?s world. We present this Scorecard intending to generate constructive dialogue and inspire positive action.
SCORECARD PARAMETERS
The Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard provides a snapshot of the status of the health and safety of youth in
California?s largest counties. Additionally, the Scorecard evaluates county-wide resource and spending decisions for specific
youth programs.
The 15 Counties
Counties are the main geographic units reviewed here, yet the Scorecard is rating the performance of more than county
governments. Some of the data sets we reviewed are county specific (e.g., county incarceration rates and county
expenditures of Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) funds). However, other data sets are not county-based
(e.g., student-counselor and after-school programs, both of which are specific to school districts). In this Scorecard,
counties are simply the most convenient venue for the display of information from various reporting sources.
With these limits in mind, the largest 15 counties are included in the scorecard (in order from largest to smallest
population): Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, San Bernardino, Santa Clara, Riverside, Alameda, Sacramento, Contra Costa,
Fresno, San Francisco, Ventura, San Mateo, Kern and San Joaquin. Eighty-three percent of California youth live in
these counties.6
WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
Scorecard Process & Indicators
From June to September 2002, ?Choices for Youth? collected and analyzed data about violence prevention from a variety of
local, county, state and federal sources. The Scorecard has two sections: Safe Communities looking at safety indicators, and
Availability of Choices for Youth focusing on funding streams. In selecting the safety indicators and funding streams to
analyze ?Choices for Youth? consulted with many youth violence prevention stakeholders and tested dozens of indicators.7
The indicators selected in the Safe Communities section meet the following criteria: 1) research and best practices have
shown that the indicator signifies youth choices, safety and support; 2) the data sets are aggregated by county; 3) the
information is available for all 58 counties; 4) the data is from a reputable source (e.g., California Department of Education
or California Department of Health Services); and 5) the indicator has been monitored over multiple years.8
?Choices for Youth? focused the Scorecard funding analysis Availability of Choices for Youth
on a selection of major state and federal funding streams that underwrite youth violence
prevention programs for counties, schools and communities.9
In selecting the funding streams, youth violence prevention was defined as programs that
reduce a youth?s likelihood of becoming a victim of, or engaging in, a violent act, and
activities that provide positive choices for youth. This includes the sixth grader in an afterschool
gardening class, as well as the young women in Juvenile Hall who are learning job
skills.10 Whether they are in or out of the juvenile-justice system, young people deserve
choices and opportunities that will help them to make smart decisions for their futures.
GRADING METHODOLOGY + RESULT S
1 SAFE COMMUNITIES
This section provides a snapshot of a community?s support for the well-being of young
people. The measure of Safe Communities examines the following indicators of the safety
and support of youth: assault victimization rate, self-inflicted injury rate, student/counselor
ratio, incarceration rate, and high school graduation rate with University of
California/California State University (UC/CSU) qualifications.
Two of the indicators?self-inflicted injury and assault victimization?measure how safe
youth are in their communities by assessing how many are victims of assault (by others or
self-inflicted). Incarceration and graduation with UC/CSU requirements reflect the extent to which youth have choices.
Student/Counselor ratio measures the level of support (of a caring adult) that is available at school, where youth spend the
majority of each day. The Scorecard focuses in general on older youth who are not supported by traditional early-childhood
funds. Where possible we used data sets that provided information for ages 10 to 17, however, in some cases this was
not possible.
The Scorecard gives the counties a rank within the state for each indicator.11 Counties are given overall letter grades based
on the average of their rankings for the five indicators.
Average State Ranking: 1st ? 11th A
Average State Ranking: 12th ? 23rd B
Average State Ranking: 24th ? 35th C
Average State Ranking: 36th ? 47th D
Average State Ranking: 48th ? 58th F
Choices for Youth
Page 3
DO YOU PERSONALLY KNOW A
YOUNG PERSON THAT HAS
BEEN A VICTIM OF VIOLENCE?
From the San Francisco Youth Violence
Prevention Survey, conducted by H.O.M.E.Y.,
March 2002, (N =251, youth ages 12-17)
NO
28%
YES
72%
WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
Safe Communities Results
Safe Communities Narrative
VENTURA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BVentura
County?s strongest indicator ranking (15th) lies in its incarceration rate ? 129 in 100,000 youth. It ranked relatively
high as well (17th) in the graduation indicator with 37 percent of high school students graduating with UC/CSU
requirements. Ventura is ranked the middle of California?s 58 counties (23rd) for its rate of self-inflicted injury, at 37 of
100,000 youth, and for the assault rate (23rd) with 13 out of 100,000 youth affected. The weakest indicator for Ventura
is its student/counselor ratio, with 1043 students for every counselor, yielding a ranking of 32nd statewide.
SAN FRANCISCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
San Francisco County leads all 58 counties with its student/counselor ratio, 554 students per counselor.12 It is ranked 2nd
among all counties in the percentage of high-school graduates with UC/CSU requirements (58 percent). However, San
Francisco ranks low (36th) in its rate of self-inflicted injuries (50 out of 100,000 youth), scores lower with its incarceration
rate (43rd), and experiences the state?s highest rate of youth assault with 69 out of 100,000 youth injured annually.
SAN DIEGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
San Diego County ranks 13th among the state?s 58 counties for both the student/counselor ratio (801 per counselor), and
15th for the percentage of students (38 percent) graduating with UC/CSU requirements. It ranks above the mean (21st) with
its incarceration rate (145 of every 100,000 youth). San Diego ranked poorly for its self-inflicted injury rate (46th), with 60
out of 100,000 youth afflicted and its assault rate (52nd), with 38 out of every 100,000 youth attacked.
RIVERSIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Riverside County was one of the most consistent counties in the Scorecard. It ranked between 25th and 36th for all five
indicators: 27th in incarceration rate (164 out of 100,000 youth); 25th in student/counselor ratio (968 students per
counselor); 36th with 30 percent of students graduating with UC/CSU requirements; 32nd in self-inflicted injury (46 out of
100,000 youth); and 36th in assault rate (25 out of 100,000 youth).
LOS ANGELES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Los Angeles County ranks in the middle of the state pack for most safety indicators. It ranked 26th in incarceration with
161 of every 100,000 youth incarcerated. Its 35 percent of high-school students graduating with UC/CSU requirements
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 4 ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized for
assault, 1999-2000
Rate per 100,000
(State Rank)
CA Dept of
Health Services
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or were
hospitalized for a selfinflicted
injury, 1999-2000
Rate per 100,000
(State Rank)
CA Dept of
Health Services
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of
Students
per Counselor
K-12, 1998-2001
(State Rank)
CA Dept
of Education
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17, 2000-2001
(State Rank)
CA Board of
Corrections
H.S. GRADUATION
WITH UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
1997-2000
(State Rank)
CA Dept
of Education
AVERAGE
STATE
RANKING /
GRADE
COUNTY
13 (23rd)
69 (58th)
38 (52nd)
25 (36th)
51 (57th)
29 (44th)
17 (30th)
31 (47th)
20 (32nd)
40 (54th)
25 (35th)
33 (49th)
22 (33rd)
46 (55th)
36 (51st)
Ventura
San Francisco
San Diego
Riverside
Los Angeles
Contra Costa
San Mateo
San Joaquin
Santa Clara
Sacramento
Fresno
Kern
Orange
Alameda
San Bernardino
1,043 (32nd)
554 (1st)
801 (13th)
968 (25th)
908 (23rd)
1,344 (49th)
1,087 (35th)
753 (10th)
1,235 (45th)
1,003 (28th)
1,095 (36th)
1,007 (29th)
1,641 (54th)
1,062 (34th)
895 (22nd)
129 (15th)
240 (43rd)
145 (21st)
164 (27th)
161 (26th)
141 (18th)
214 (37th)
189 (31st)
177 (29th)
208 (34th)
253 (45th)
143 (20th)
148 (22nd)
192 (32nd)
210 (36th)
37% (17th)
58% (2nd)
38% (15th)
30% (36th)
35% (24th)
44% (6th)
44% (5th)
30% (38th)
45% (4th)
33% (26th)
32% (31st)
20% (54th)
35% (21st)
39% (13th)
25% (48th)
22 /
28 /
29 /
31 /
31 /
31 /
32 /
32 /
33 /
33 /
33 /
34 /
35 /
38 /
39 /
BC
C
C
C
C
CCCCCCCD
D
*See Appendices A-E on pages 26-32 for data sets and calculations.
SAFE COMMUNITIES ? TABLE 1*
37 (23rd)
50 (36th)
60 (46th)
46 (32nd)
40 (26th)
53 (40th)
85 (52nd)
49 (34th)
93 (54th)
38 (24th)
35 (20th)
28 (17th)
60 (47th)
115 (56th)
51 (37th)
ranks 24th and its rate of self-inflicted injury (40 out of 100,000 youth) ranks 26th. Los Angeles ranked 23rd in
student/counselor ratio, with 908 students per counselor. Los Angeles? assault rate, however, was one of the highest rates in
the state, yielding a ranking of 57th.
CONTRA COSTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Contra Costa ranks 6th in its yield (44 percent) of high-school graduates meeting UC/CSU requirements. It has a betterthan-
average showing (18th) in its incarceration rate, with 141 out of 100,000 youth in Juvenile Hall. But Contra Costa
ranks in the bottom 20 counties for self-inflicted injury (40th), with 53 of 100,000 youth afflicted, assault (44th) affecting
29 per 100,000 youth, and the student/counselor ratio (49th) with 1,344 students per counselor.
SAN MATEO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSan
Mateo County comes out strong in the graduation indicator (5th) with 44 percent of high-school students graduating
with UC/CSU requirements. It scores poorly (52nd) in the rate of self-inflicted injuries with 85 of 100,000 youth. San Mateo
comes up 30th in assault, 35th in student/counselor ratio, with 1,087 students per each counselor, and ranks a bit lower
(37th) in its incarceration rate, with 214 out of 100,000 youth.
SAN JOAQUIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSan
Joaquin?s student/counselor ratio is 753 to 1, which places it 10th in the state. The county ranks 31st for its
incarceration rate, at 189 per 100,000 youth, and 34th (49 out of 100,000 youth) for self-inflicted injury, and 38th in highschool
students graduating with UC/CSU requirements (30 percent). San Joaquin?s lowest standing (47th) comes in its
assault rate, with 31 per 100,000 youth assaulted.
SANTA CLARA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSanta
Clara County has a high ranking (4th) for high-school students graduating with UC/CSU requirements (45 percent).
Its student/counselor ratio of 1,235 students per counselor puts it at 45 out of 58 counties. The county?s worst performance
is its rate of self-inflicted injury, 54th in the state, with 93 of every 100,000 afflicted. Santa Clara County ranks in the
middle of the state (29th) in its incarceration rate (177 of 100,000 youth), and its assault rate (32nd), with 20 out of
100,000 youth assaulted.
SACRAMENTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSacramento
County ranks in the middle for most indicators. Its assault rate, however, is lower-than-average (54th) with 40
out of every 100,000 youth assaulted. Sacramento County has average rankings for incarceration (34th), student/counselor
ratio (28th), graduation with UC/CSU requirements (26th), and self-inflicted injury (24th).
FRESNO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CFresno
County barely scrapes into the top 20 counties? rankings for low self-inflicted injury rates, with 35 out of every
100,000 youth affected. It earns an average ranking (31st) with 32 percent of high school students graduating with UC/CSU
requirements, and falls a bit below average (35th) with its assault rate, 25 of every 100,000. The areas in greatest need of
improvement are Fresno?s student/counselor ratio, 36th in the state, with 1,095 students per counselor, and its incarceration
rate, 253 of every 100,000 youth incarcerated, which ranks the county with the 45th highest incarceration rate in state.
KERN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CKern
County?s rate of self-inflicted injury, with 28 out of 100,000 youth injured, ranks it 17th lowest statewide. Similarly,
with 143 out of 100,000 youth incarcerated, Kern ranks 20th lowest in incarceration. The County scored average (29th)
with a student/counselor ratio of 1,007 students per counselor. The County has a chance to
improve its assault rate (49th) at 33 of every 100,000 youth, and its percentage of highschool
students graduating with UC/CSU requirements (currently only 20 percent) putting
the county near the bottom of the state at 54th.
ORANGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .COrange
County ranked above average (22nd) for its incarceration rate (148 of every
100,000 youth), and for students graduating with UC/CSU requirements (21st), and 33rd
for its assault rate of 22 of 100,000 youth. However, its rate of 60 of 100,000 youth with
self-inflicted injuries, and 1,641 students for every counselor puts the county at 47th and
54th in the state, respectively.
Choices for Youth is funded by a grant
from The California Wellness Foundation
to i.e. communications, LLC, and seeks
to increase support for effective youth
violence prevention programs. In 1992,
the Foundation created a grant making
initiative to prevent violence as a
response to the devastating effects of
violence against youth, with youth ?
more than any other age group ? being
most vulnerable to violence. Through
this initiative, the Foundation provides
grants to individuals, communities and
institutions that seek to implement and
sustain violence-prevention efforts.
CAMPAIGN BACKGROUND
Choices for Youth
Page 5
WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
ALAMEDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
Alameda County ranked 13th with 39 percent of high-school students graduating with UC/CSU requirements. It falls
in the middle for both its incarceration rate (192 of 100,000 youth) and the student/counselor ratio (1,062 students per
counselor). Alameda faired poorly (55th), however, for its assault rate with 46 out of 100,000 youth assaulted, and its
self-inflicted injury rate, with 115 out of 100,000 youth afflicted.
SAN BERNARDINO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
San Bernardino County scored above average (22nd) with its student/counselor ratio of 895 students per counselor.
Unfortunately, it scored below average for the remaining indicators, with an incarceration rate of 210 out of every 100,000
youth (36th), a self-inflicted injury rate of 51 out of 100,000 youth (37th), 25 percent of high-school students graduating
with UC/CSU requirements (48th) and an assault rate of 36 out of every 100,000 youth (51st).
2 AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH
?Choices for Youth? believes the level of funding available is critical to a county?s ability to provide youth a safe and healthy
environment and positive alternatives. This section looks at four of the state and federal funding streams for youth that
provide specific crime and violence prevention state funding (JJCPA), after-school programs, job training and mentoring.
For each of the funding areas, the Scorecard keys in on specific, measurable areas and grades the county?s focus on
prevention. Focusing on particular funding streams, the Scorecard evaluates: whether Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention
Act funds went to prevention programs;13 whether after-school program funds were allocated to high-school students;
whether older youth who are out-of-school and unemployed have access to federal job training programs; and, whether
counties aggressively sought out state funds for mentoring programs.| Crime and Violence Prevention Funding (JJCPA): The Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA, Schiff-Cardenas
2000) allocated more than $100 million to the 15 largest counties in California, and earmarked the initial allocation of
funds (2000-01) for violence prevention programs and activities.14,15 The Scorecard reports the percentage of JJCPA funds
dedicated to prevention (activities and opportunities for learning) compared to funding for enforcement and suppression.16
While each county is using its funding in accordance with the statute, the intention of the Scorecard analysis is to focus
on prevention programs that provide choices for youth. ?Choices for Youth? worked with a panel of juvenile-justice
experts to identify prevention programs, compared to those more focused on enforcement or suppression.17| After-School Funds to High Schools: Currently, most major funding streams focus on elementary- and middle-school
youth.18 According to statewide voter polls, Californians have expressed that they want to see after-school programs
expanded to include high-school youth.19 The Scorecard examines the proportion of major federal funding available for
high-school youth.20 Only one in 20 California high schools has a state- or federally-funded after-school program.21
The 21st Century Learning Centers is the only major state or federal funding stream that allows after-school funding to
support high school youth.22 In the 2000 and 2001 fiscal years, this federal program provided $52 million in grants to the 15
largest counties. The Scorecard reports the percentage of these funds available to high-school youth.23| Federal Jobs Programs Available to Older Youth: The Scorecard reports the percentage of older teens (16-19), who are not
working and are not in school and therefore could be served by a local Workforce Investment Act (WIA) job program.24
The federal WIA provided $72.5 million to California?s largest 15 counties in 2000 for youth jobs programs (youth
14-21).25 These are funds allocated to job training, placement and skill building.26| State Mentoring Grants Secured: The Scorecard reports the percentage of the California
Governor?s Mentoring Partnership funding each county secured. Through the Governor?s
Mentoring Partnership, the Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol
and Drug, and the Department of Community Services and Development allocated
$8.5 million to the largest 15 counties from 1998-2001. These grants are awarded
through a competitive bidding process, requiring county initiative and an emphasis
on mentoring.27
?IT GIVES OFF A POSITIVE
FEELING TO KNOW IN THE END
WE ARE TRYING TO HELP YOUTH
AND PREVENT ANY AMOUNT OF
VIOLENCE THEY MAY WITNESS
OR EXPERIENCE? ? HILARY, 16
From the Central Valley Regional Forum,
January 2002
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 6
Availability of Choices for Youth Results
Availability of Choices for Youth Narrative
FRESNO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AFresno
County spends all of its JJCPA funds on prevention programs. It also earns high marks for providing job training to
94 percent of older youth. In addition, the county channels 34 percent of available after-school funding to high schools.
The community captured 3 percent of available state funding for mentoring programs.
ALAMEDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B+
All of Alameda County?s JJCPA funding is directed to violence-prevention programs. Alameda has secured 17 percent of the
available mentoring funds and directs 24 percent of after-school funding to high schools. The county is able to provide job
training to approximately 20 percent of 16-19 year olds.
VENTURA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B
Ventura County designates over half of its 21st Century after-school funds to high-school programs. Eighty-nine percent
of the county?s JJCPA dollars goes to prevention programs, and the county has secured 3 percent of the available state
mentoring funds. In terms of job training, the county provides ample opportunity for youth who are not in school and are
unemployed (142 percent?above 100 percent due to overlap of ages in calculation).
SAN JOAQUIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BSan
Joaquin County spends 85 percent of JJCPA funds on prevention programs. Nearly half of its after-school funding is
available to high-school youth (49 percent). San Joaquin is able to serve 48 percent of youth between 16 and 19 through
its federal job training program, but only captured 5 percent of the mentoring funding.
SAN DIEGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BSan
Diego County designates 93 percent of JJCPA funds to prevention programs. The county has secured 14 percent of
available mentoring funds. Thirty-three of the state after-school funds are available for high-school youth, and the local
federal job training programs can serve 7 percent of youth aged 16 to 19.
Choices for Youth
Page 7
COUNTY CRIME PREVENTION
Juvenile Justice and Crime
Prevention Act (JJCPA)
funding for prevention
vs. enforcement
or suppression (2000-01)
% of JJCPA to
prevention programs
AFTER-SCHOOL
Federal after-school
funding available to
high-school youth
(2000 and 2001)
% of county total
JOB TRAINING
Percentage of youth who
potentially gained job
experience through the
federal job training
program (1999-00)28
MENTORING
Percentage of state
mentoring grants
awarded to each
county (1998-01)*
% of total to largest
15 counties
GRADE
Fresno 100% 34% 94% 3% AAlameda
100% 24% 20% 17% B+
Ventura 89% 58% 142% 3% B
San Joaquin 85% 49% 48% 5% BSan
Diego 93% 33% 7% 14% BLos
Angeles 79% 37% 31% 36% BSan
Francisco 100% 25% 14% 0% C+
Riverside 92% 36% 1% 5% C
Santa Clara 94% 3% 17% 2% C
Sacramento 85% 0% 29% 6% C
San Mateo 100% 0% 4% 1% COrange
72% 21% 6% 6% D
San Bernardino 34% 0% 16% 1% D
Contra Costa 26% 36% 7% 1% D
Kern 61% 0% n/a** 1% D
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol
and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the Department of Community Services and Development
** WIA data for Kern included Inyo and Mono counties.
See Appendix F on page 33 for Full Data Table and Appendices G-J on pages 33-36 for data spreadsheets.
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH ? TABLE 2
LOS ANGELES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BLos
Angeles County has secured 36 percent of the available state mentoring grants. The federal job training program in
LA can serve 31 percent of youth between 16 and 19. Seventy-nine percent of the county?s JJCPA funds are spent on
prevention, and 37 percent of its after-school funding supports high-school students.
SAN FRANCISCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C+
All San Francisco?s JJCPA funds go to prevention programs, and a quarter of its after-school funding goes to high schools.
San Francisco has secured none of the mentoring funding available from the state, and 14 percent of San Francisco youth
ages 16 to 19 are served by local WIA funding.29
RIVERSIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Riverside County?s designates 92 percent of its JJCPA funding for prevention programs. It secured 5 percent of available
state mentoring funds and allocated 36 percent of after-school funds to high-school youth. Riverside?s WIA funds can serve
one percent of the county?s 16 to 19 year olds.
SANTA CLARA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Santa Clara County designates almost all, 94 percent, of its JJCPA funds to prevention programs. Three percent of the afterschool
funds is available to high-school programs. Santa Clara?s federal job training program can serve 17 percent of the
youth ages 16 to 19. The county has secured two percent of the available mentoring grants.
SACRAMENTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C
Sacramento County designates 85 percent of its JJCPA funds to prevention programs. The county has secured 6 percent of
the available mentoring funds. Sacramento does not serve any high school youth with its after-school 21st Century funding,
and its federal job training program could serve 29 percent of youth ages 16 to 19.
SAN MATEO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSan
Mateo County makes a strong showing in JJCPA funding with 100 percent going to prevention programs, yet none of
its 21st Century grants support high-school programs. The county has secured 1 percent of the available state mentoring
funds, and its WIA funds can serve 4 percent of youth between 16 and 19.
ORANGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
Orange County spends 72 percent of JJCPA funds on prevention programs. The county gives 21 percent of after-school
funds to high schools. Orange County has secured 6 percent of the available mentoring funds, and its federal job program
serves 6 percent of youth.
SAN BERNARDINO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
San Bernardino County designates none of its after-school funds to high schools. The county has secured one percent of
available state mentoring grants, and can serve 16 percent of youth 16 to 19 with the federal job training program.
San Bernardino spends 34 percent of its JJCPA funds on prevention programs.
CONTRA COSTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
Contra Costa County spends 26 percent of its JJCPA funds on prevention programs. The county
gives 36 percent of after-school funding to high schools. It has secured one percent of the
available state mentoring grants, and seven percent of youth between 16-19 can be served by
the federal job training program.
KERN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D
Kern County designates 61 percent of its JJCPA funding to prevention programs. The
county has secured one percent of the available state mentoring funds, and does not
allocate any of its state after-school funding to high schools. The data were not available
to determine the percentage served with the WIA funds.
3 PROMISE AND PROGRESS (This section is not graded)
Counties are multidimensional and offer a variety of services and opportunities not fully
captured in this Scorecard. In order to acknowledge the range of choices for youth that do not
fall under the major funding streams, we surveyed county departments for local initiatives,
funding efforts and actions at the local level that prevent violence. Each of the following
county profiles includes county-contributed examples of ?promise and progress.? 30
We asked county departments what are
the biggest obstacles in local efforts to
support violence prevention and
choices for youth. Of the 44 responses,
there were several concerns that
crossed county lines:| FUNDING: the need for new funding
sources and initiatives, as well as
innovative prevention programs.| COMMUNICATION: Specifically, a
lack of communication between
schools and government, as well as
information flowing among counties
about innovative programs.| STAFFING AND SUPPORT:
Specifically, staff to provide technical
assistance and training to providers as
well as to coordinate existing efforts.
OBSTACLES
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 8 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
Choices for Youth
Page 9
ALAMEDA
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 46 115 1062 192 39%
State Rank 55th 56th 34th 32nd 13th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Alameda?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 100% 24% 20% ** 17%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 1,443,741 (7th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 10.5% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 13.9% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 12.6 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION ALAMEDA COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE| Safe Passages ? A partnership of the City of Oakland, Alameda County, the Oakland Unified School District, and community
agencies to help Oakland?s kids stay out of trouble, stay in school, and have the best opportunity to meet their potential. Two of
their three strategies focus on middle and high-school youth: Early Childhood, Middle School and Youth Offender.| Oakland Fund for Children and Youth ? $7 million/yr to children and youth services| California Gang, Crime and Violence Prevention Partnership Program Grantee 2002 ? Youth Alive (Oakland)
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
DEMOGRAPHICS OF ALAMEDA YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
Native American
.4%
2 or More Races
6%
Other Race
.4%
African American
17%
Caucasian
33%
Latino
23%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
20%
N = 151,546
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth B+
D
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 10 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
CONTRA COSTA
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 29 53 1344 141 44%
State Rank 44th 40th 49th 18th 6th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Contra Costa?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 26% 36% 7% ** .8%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 948,816 (9th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 11.9% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 9.4% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 9.6 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION CONTRA COSTA COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE| Afterschool 4 All - $900,000 county initiative for after-school programs| Contra Costa Children and Families Policy Forum - ?Community Approach Award? (Foundation Consortium)| ?Zero Tolerance for Domestic Violence? Initiative - Recognized by Attorney General's Office as model of community strategies
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth D
C
DEMOGRAPHICS OF CONTRA COSTA YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
Native American
.4%
2 or More Races
5%
Other Race
.4%
African American
11%
Caucasian
50%
Latino
21%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
11%
N = 112,635
Choices for Youth
Page 11
FRESNO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF FRESNO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Native American
.8%
2 or More Races
3% Other Race
.2%
African American
5%
Caucasian
30%
Latino
50%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
11%
N = 114,017| KNOW-MORE Program - Provides mentorship services to 10 junior-high schools in Fresno| County Office of Education Youth Service Council - 30 high school students developing opportunities for student involvement in
Fresno County| OJJDP (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention) Award
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Statistics 25 35 1095 253 32%
State Rank 35th 20th 36th 45th 31st
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Fresno?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 100% 34% 94% ** 3%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 799,407 (10th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 14.3% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 30.8% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 13.2 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION FRESNO COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth AC-
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 12 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
KERN
DEMOGRAPHICS OF KERN YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**WIA data for Kern included Inyo and Mono counties.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.| The Family Violence Prevention Strategic Planning Grant ? Kern County Department of Public Health (KCDPH)| Family Violence Prevention Strategic Planning Grant| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002 - Greenfield After-School SUCCESS Program (Bakersfield)
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.8%
2 or More Races
3%
Other Race
.2%
African American
6%
Caucasian
42%
Latino
45%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
3%
N = 94,013
Statistics 33 28 1007 143 20%
State Rank 49th 17th 29th 20th 54th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Kern?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 61% 0% n/a ** .6%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 661,645 (14th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 14.2% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 26.3% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 12.7 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION KERN COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth D
C-
Choices for Youth
Page 13
African American
11%
LOS ANGELES
DEMOGRAPHICS OF LOS ANGELES YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.| Gang and Violence Prevention Grantee 2002 - Volunteer Center of Los Angeles Assistance League of Southern California| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Sites 2002 - LA?s BEST, Pasadena LEARNS| Los Angeles County Quality and Productivity Commission - Top Ten Award for School-Based Probation Supervision (October 2001)
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.3%
2 or More Races
3% Other Race
.2%
Caucasian
21%
Latino
54%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
11%
N = 1,128,298
Statistics 51 40 908 161 35%
State Rank 57th 26th 23rd 26th 24th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Los Angeles? share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 79% 37% 31% ** 36%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 9,519,338 (1st) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 11.9% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 23.7% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 14.0 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION LOS ANGELES COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth BC
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 14 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
ORANGE
DEMOGRAPHICS OF ORANGE YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| FACT (Families and Communities Together) - $8 million annually to prevention activities and family support services| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002 ? Anaheim Achieves
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.3%
2 or More Races
3%
Other Race
.2%
African American
2%
Caucasian
43% Latino
38%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
14%
N = 320,477
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 22 60 1641 148 35%
State Rank 33rd 47th 54th 22nd 21st
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Orange?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 72% 21% 6% ** 6%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 2,846,289 (2nd) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 11.3% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 12.9% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 5.2 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth D
C-
Choices for Youth
Page 15
RIVERSIDE
DEMOGRAPHICS OF RIVERSIDE YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| Cities, Counties and Schools ?Youth Violence Prevention Excellence Award? - Healthy People/Healthy Places Wellness
Centers Initiative, collaboration between Riverside County, Riverside Unified School District, Riverside Police Department,
and the University of California, Riverside| CSAC (California State Association of Counties) Award - Kids with Guns Protocol
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.7%
2 or More Races
3% Other Race
.2%
African American
7%
Caucasian
41%
Latino
44%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
4%
N = 207,594
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 25 46 968 164 30%
State Rank 36th 32nd 25th 27th 36th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Riverside?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 92% 36% 1% ** 5%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 1,545,387 (6th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 13.4% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 17.8% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 10.4 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION RIVERSIDE COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth C
C
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 16 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
SACRAMENTO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SACRAMENTO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| New American Community Award, 2000 - Neighborhood Accountability Board Program| Youth Inspire! Collaborative| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002 - Sacramento START
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.8%
2 or More Races
6% Other Race
.4%
African American
12%
Caucasian
48%
Latino
19%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
14%
N = 149,652
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 40 38 1003 208 33%
State Rank 54th 24th 28th 34th 26th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Sacramento?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 85% 0% 29% ** 6%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 1,223,499 (8th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 12.2% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 19.9% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 18.6 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SACRAMENTO COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth C
C-
Choices for Youth
Page 17
SAN BERNARDINO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SAN BERNARDINO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| California Gang, Crime and Violence Prevention Partnership Program Grantee 2002 - Child Advocates of San Bernardino County| CSAC (California State Association of Counties) Award - CAT (Community Assessment Teams)| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002 - CAPS (Creative After School Program for Success)
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
1%
2 or More Races
3% Other Race
.2%
African American
10%
Caucasian
36%
Latino
45%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
4%
N = 245,111
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 36 51 895 210 25%
State Rank 51st 37th 22nd 36th 48th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
San Bernardino?s share
of the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 34% 0% 16% ** 1%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 1,709,434 (4th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 14.3% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 19.6% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 10.7 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SAN BERNARDINO
COUNTY
CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth D
D
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 18 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
SAN DIEGO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SAN DIEGO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| California Gang, Crime and Violence Prevention Partnership Program Grantee 2002 - Social Advocates for Youth| CSAC (California State Association of Counties) Award - CAT (Community Assessment Teams)| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002 - San Diego ?6 to 6?
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.6%
2 or More Races
4% Other Race
.3%
African American
7%
Caucasian
44%
Latino
35%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
9%
N = 312,211
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 38 60 801 145 38%
State Rank 52nd 46th 13th 21st 15th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
San Diego?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 93% 33% 7% ** 14%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 2,813,833 (3rd) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 11.1% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 16.2% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 8.8 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SAN DIEGO COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth BC
Choices for Youth
Page 19
SAN FRANCISCO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SAN FRANCISCO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| The Children?s Fund - $30 million/yr supporting services for children, youth and their families| Youth IMPACT - Youth-led evaluation of city and county-funded programs| Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives (JDAI) site| OJJDP (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention) Gang Free San Francisco Initiative| Department of Public Health - YouthPOWER| California After-School Partnership Learning Hub Site 2002: San Francisco ExCEL
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.2%
2 or More Races
5%
Other Race
.5%
African American
12%
Caucasian
21%
Latino
21%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
41%
N = 49,605
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 69 50 554 240 58%
State Rank 58th 36th 1st 43rd 2nd
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
San Francisco?s share
of the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 100% 25% 14% ** 0%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 776,733 (11th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 6.4% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 13.6% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 16.4 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SAN FRANCISCO
COUNTY
CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth C+
C
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 20 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
SAN JOAQUIN
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SAN JOAQUIN YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD
The Youth Violence Prevention Council
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.6%
2 or More Races
5% Other Race
.3%
African American
7%
Caucasian
38%
Latino
34%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
14%
N = 79,098
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 31 49 753 189 30%
State Rank 47th 34th 10th 31st 38th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
San Joaquin?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 85% 49% 48% ** 5%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 563,598 (15th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 14% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 22.9% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 9.8 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth BC-
Choices for Youth
Page 21
SAN MATEO
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SAN MATEO YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| VolunTEEN Program, Center for Domestic and Violence Prevention - Youth Service Group of the Year nomination| Certificate of Recognition from CA State Assembly - After-School Homework Centers| Certificate of Recognition from CA State Senate - After-School Homework Centers| CSAC (California State Association of Counties) Challenge Award - After-School Homework Centers
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.2%
2 or More Races
5% Other Race
.4%
African American
4%
Caucasian
40% Latino
29%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
21%
N = 69,796
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 17 85 1087 214 44%
State Rank 30th 52nd 35th 37th 5th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
San Mateo?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 100% 0% 4% ** .6%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 707,161 (13th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 9.9% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 5.9% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 3.4 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SAN MATEO COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth CC-
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 22 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
SANTA CLARA
DEMOGRAPHICS OF SANTA CLARA YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives (JDAI) site| $803,181 annually from county general fund for Violence Prevention Program| $125,000/yr for 2 years from Packard Foundation to fund Violence Prevention Information Library
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.3%
2 or More Races
4%
Other Race
.3%
African American
3%
Caucasian
36%
Latino
31%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
25%
N = 176,259
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 20 93 1235 177 45%
State Rank 32nd 54th 45th 29th 4th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Santa Clara?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 94% 3% 17%** 2%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 1,682,585 (5th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 10.5% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 8.6% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 6.3 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION SANTA CLARA COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth C
C-
Choices for Youth
Page 23
VENTURA
DEMOGRAPHICS OF VENTURA YOUTH 10-17 YRS OLD| Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives (JDAI) site| Conojo Youth Task Force
PROMISE AND PROGRESS
Native American
.5%
2 or More Races
3%
Other Race
.2%
African American
2%
Caucasian
50%
Latino
40%
Asian / Pacific
Islander
5%
N = 94,663
* Mentoring funding streams through the Governors Mentoring Partnership, ?98-01 allocations: Office of Secretary of Education, the Department of Alcohol and Drug (Friday Night Live), and the
Department of Community Services and Development.
**Ratio compares youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed and not in school that same year (US
Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
See Appendices on pages 26-36 for full data sets, source information and calculations.
Statistics 13 37 1043 129 37%
State Rank 23rd 23rd 32nd 15th 17th
CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Juvenile
Justice and Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
programs (2000-01)
JOBS
Percentage of unemployed
and not-in-school
youth who potentially
gained job experience
through the federal job
training program
MENTORING*
Ventura?s share of
the $8.5 million in
competitive state
mentor funding
ASSAULT
VICTIMIZATION
Youth ages 10-17
hospitalized
for assault
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
SELF-INFLICTED INJURY
Youth ages 10-17 who
committed suicide or
were hospitalized for
a self-inflicted injury
(1999-2000)
Rate per 100,000
STUDENT
COUNSELOR RATIO
Number of Students
per Guidance
Counselor, K-12,
(1998-2001)
INCARCERATION
Avg. Daily Population
in Juvenile Hall per
100,000 youth ages
10-17 (2000-2001)
Rate per 100,000
HIGH SCHOOL
GRADUATION WITH
UC/CSU
REQUIREMENTS
Average % of
graduates
(1997-2000)
Statistics 89% 58% 142% ** 3%
*Data Sources: US Census 2000; Dept of Social Services, Research and
Development (Foster Care)
Total Population 753,197 (12th) 33,871,648
% 10-17 years old 12.6% 11.9%
% 5-17 Living 11.2% 18.5%
in Poverty
Foster Care Rate per 3.9 10.7
1,000 Children 0-17
(Average Rate 2000-01)
AT-A-GLANCE
DESCRIPTION VENTURA COUNTY CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE
AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH?
SAFE COMMUNITY?
AFTER SCHOOL
Percentage of
federal after-school
funding available to
high school youth B
B-
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 24 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
NOTES
1 1998 Hospitalized Injury Surveillance System, California Department of Health Services; America?s Children Key National Indicators of Well-Being
2 California Department of Health Services, Vital Statistics Death Statistical Master File, EPIC Branch, 1996-2000
3 Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (1999)
4 Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention Act; Before and After School Learning and Safe Neighborhoods Partnership Program
5 Seventy-nine percent of voters want the state to increase its funding to local communities for violence prevention programs. Baldasarre and Associates, May 2002.
VPI Voter Survey: www.preventviolence.org/facts/violenceFin.pdf
6 Data from US Census 2000. factfinder.census.gov/
7 For example, we tested arrest rates along with incarceration rates and decided that incarceration would better express the situation of youth and the spectrum of
choices. For the Availability of Choices for Youth section, we tested several indicators collected from local Park and Recreation facilities. After two surveys to over
300 agencies, we excluded the data due to a lack of consistency across agencies.
8 We acknowledge there are several other indicators that could be used to provide a complete picture of Safe Communities. In partnership with our Advisory Team, and
in order to focus our efforts, we used these to provide a snapshot that is representative of realities facing youth and their choices.
9 The Scorecard does not include all funding streams and activities initiated by local governments in supporting choices for youth. ?Choices for Youth? recognizes that
there are thousands of community-based organizations in the state that contribute meaningfully to providing choices for youth. This Scorecard?s focus is on
opportunities at the government level.
10 We have included elements of all three aspects of the public-health prevention definition: primary prevention (avoidance of onset), secondary prevention (early
intervention), and tertiary prevention (treatment/rehabilitation). www.mentalhealth.org/youthviolence/
11 There are 58 counties in California. (See Appendices starting on page 26 for full list.)
12 Note that while San Francisco leads the state in its student/counselor ratio of 554:1 (the state average is 980:1), this ratio remains well below the American
Counseling Association?s recommended ratio of 250:1. For more information, visit www.counseling.org
13 As JJCPA funds comprise the largest source of potential investment, use of these funds for prevention programs was given twice the weight of other sources of
funding in the Availability of Choices for Youth grading process.
14 The first allocation spanned two fiscal years and is reported as 2000-01 allocations.
15 JJCPA is not the only violence prevention funding stream; others include the Gang and Violence Prevention Act and Safe Schools funding. The Scorecard focused on
JJCPA because each county is given a pool of money to allocate to prevention or other types of programming.
16 Funding for enforcement and suppression has other sources such as COPS (Citizens? Option for Public Safety), a state funding stream which has a distribution roughly
equivalent to JJCPA (with $116 million in 2002-03 allocated to the 58 counties) for enforcement purposes. For COPS allocations see:
www.sco.ca.gov/ard/payments/cops/cops0900.pdf
17 Members of the prevention jury panel included Jim Mayer and Nancy Lyons, Little Hoover Commission, Dan Macallair, Center for Juvenile and Criminal Justice, David
Steinhart, Commonweal, John Rhoads, former Chief of Probation, Santa Cruz County, and Peter Greenwood, Greenwood and Associates.
18 Proposition 49 calls for an after-school program in every elementary and middle school. High schools are not included.
19 Eighty percent of surveyed voters favor expanding the state?s after-school program funding to include high schools. Baldasarre and Associates, May 2002. VPI Voter
Survey: www.preventviolence.org/facts/violenceFin.pdf
20 The After-School Learning and Safe Neighborhoods Partnership Program (ASLSNP) is another major source of after-school funding. This funding stream provided over
$40 million to the 15 counties in 2000-01. The focus of these funds though, is primarily elementary schools, with some middle schools, and only one high school,
Correia High School in San Diego County. So rather than give all counties a very low score by including the ASLSNP, the scorecard instead notes that research has
shown there is a real lack of after-school programming for high-school youth in particular, and middle-school youth as well. www.cde.ca.gov/afterschool
21 UC Irvine Afterschool Collaborative Project, documented in: ?California?s After-School Choice: Juvenile Crime or Safe Learning Time,? Fight Crime: Invest in Kids
California. September 2001. www.fightcrime.org/ca/caresources.php
22 The No Child Left Behind Act converts the federal 21st Century Community Learning Centers authority to a state formula grant. In past years, the US Department of
Education made competitive awards directly to local educational agencies (LEAs). Under the reauthorized authority, funds will flow to states based on their share of
Title I, Part A funds. States will use their allocations to make competitive awards to eligible entities. Current 21st CCLC grantees will continue to be administered by
and receive funding through the US Department of Education. www.ed.gov/21stcclc/21qa98.html
23 Reports from United States Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, 21st Century Learning Center Programs. Reports indicate grant
amounts and the grade ranges served. Specific funding amounts to the various grade ranges within each grant is not reported to 21st Century. Therefore, percentages
reported do not reflect actual amounts allocated to high schools within each grant.
24 Workforce Investment Act Annual Report 2000. Numbers served of younger youth 14 to18 years old. Number of 16-19 year olds unemployed and not in school from
US Census. This is an approximation of youth served from the WIA California Annual Report 2000, and accounts for 16, 17 and 18 year olds not employed and not in
school primarily.
25 WIA youth funding allocations 1999-00. www.edd.ca.gov/wiab99-20.pdf
26 For more information on the Workforce Investment Act visit www.calwia.org
27 Data and funding amounts collected via self-reporting to the Governor?s Mentoring Partnership at the request of Jim Kooler, Director of the Governor?s Mentoring
Partnership. www.mentoring.ca.gov
Choices for Youth
Page 25
28 Ratio compares younger youth 14-18 served under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA Annual Report 2000) to the number of 16-19 yr olds who were unemployed
and not in school that same year (US Census 2000). Number of 16-19 yr olds served not currently collected by WIA.
29 San Francisco does have a unique funding stream?The Children?s Fund?which supports youth programs to the tune of $30 million (120 youth serving nonprofits).
Programs include mentoring and after-school programs. In particular, the Beacon Initiative provides after-school programs for high school youth.
30 Over 165 surveys were sent out to County Administrator Offices as well as all county departments which work either directly or indirectly with youth, including but
not limited to the following: Departments of Health Services, Human Services, Parks and Recreation, Child Services, Social Services, Community Development, Public
Safety, Communications, Park and Recreation, and County Education Office, Probation and Police Departments. County Survey:
www.preventviolence.org/download/county_survey.pdf
RESOURCES
General Violence Prevention
Youth Violence: A Report of the Surgeon General, Department of Health and Human Services, 2001.
Best Practices of Youth Violence Prevention: A Sourcebook For Community Action, Thornton TN, Craft CA, Dahlberg LL, Lynch BS and Baer K, Atlanta Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, September 2000.
Blueprints for Violence Prevention, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/
California?s After-School Choice: Juvenile Crime or Safe Learning Time, Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California, Sept. 2001.
California Safe Schools Assessment 2000-2001, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/spbranch/safety/cssa/00-01results.pdf
?Community Programs to Promote Youth Development,? National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences 2002.
Crime and Violence Prevention Center, Office of the Attorney General, California Department of Justice, caag.state.ca.us/cvpc/fa_youth_violence.html
Indicators of School Crime and Safety 2001, Bureau of Justice Statistics, www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/iscs01.pdf
National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, www.safeyouth.org/home.htm
Never Too Early, Never Too Late, To Prevent Youth Crime & Violence, Little Hoover Commission, June 2001. www.lhc.ca.gov/lhc.html
Safe Schools Task Force: Final Report, Attorney General and State Superintendent of Public Instruction, June 2000, caag.state.ca.us/publications/safeschool.pdf
?The Spectrum of Prevention: Developing a Comprehensive Approach to Injury Prevention,? The Prevention Institute, Cohen, Larry and Swift, Susan, 1995, The
Prevention Institute
?Young Enough to Matter?, California Coalition for Youth and The California Wellness Foundation, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative, www.calyouth.org
Youth Violence Facts, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Center for Disease Control, www.cdc.gov/ncipc/factsheets/yvfacts.htm
California County Fact Book 2001, The California Institute for County Government and California State Association of Counties, July 2001.
www.cicg.org/publications/profiles
California County Data Book 2001, Children Now, 2001, www.childrennow.org/california/rc-2001/databook-2001.pdf
California Report Card 2001, Children Now, 2001, www.childrennow.org/california/rc-2001/reportcard-2001.htm
County Demographic Data, California Department of Finance, California County Profiles
2001 Children in the States, Children?s Defense Fund, 2001, www.childrensdefense.org/statesdata.htm
Fact Book 2002, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/resrc/factbook/guidandcoun.htm
Scorecard Data Sources
21st Century Community Learning Centers Program, US Department of Education, www.ed.gov/21stcclc/
After School Learning and Safe Partnerships, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/afterschool/factsheet.pdf
After School Online Center, UC Irvine After School Collaborative, www.gse.uci.edu/asp
Assault and Self-Inflicted Injury Rates (Fatal), California Department of Health Services, Epidemiology for Prevention and Injury Control Branch (EPIC), EPIC Fatal
Injuries, www.applications.dhs.ca.gov/epicdata/TBfatal.html
Assault and Self-Inflicted Injury Rates (Nonfatal), California Department of Health Services, Epidemiology for Prevention and Injury Control Branch (EPIC), EPIC
Nonfatal Injuries, www.applications.dhs.ca.gov/epicdata/TBnonfatal.html
Average High School Grads Completed UC/CSU Requirements 1997-00, California Dept of Education, Data Quest, data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/
California Governor?s Mentoring Partnership, www.mentoring.ca.gov
Census age by single year, U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000 Summary File 2 (SF 2) 100-Percent Data, factfinder.census.gov
Early Youth Allocations (14-18 yrs), Workforce Investment Act 2000, www.edd.ca.gov/wiab99-20.pdf
Educational Demographics Office, California Dept of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/demographics
Employment Data: Percentage Youth in School or Working (16-19 yrs old), U.S. Census Bureau, Profile of Selected Economic Statistics 2000
Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA), California Board of Corrections, www.bdcorr.ca.gov/cppd/cpa_2000/cpa_2000_page.htm
Labor Market Information by County, Employment Development Department, www.calmis.cahwnet.gov/htmlfile/county.htm
Local Workforce Investment Boards, California Workforce Investment Board, www.calwia.org/Local_Areas/index.tpl
Student/Counselor Ratio, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/spbranch/ssp/cratio00_01.htm
Workforce Investment Act Annual Report 2000, www.calwia.org/PDF_Reference/CAARrev1.pdf
Sample State and Federal Violence Prevention Efforts
California After School Partnership Learning Hub, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/news/releases2002/relasp0502.htm
1998-2002 California Gang Crime and Violence Grantees, California Gang, Crime and Violence Prevention Partnership Programs,
caag.state.ca.us/cvpc/publications/Gangs_Grantee_Recipients.pdf
AB1113 School Safety Block Grant, California Department of Education, www.cde.ca.gov/spbranch/safety/grantresults/AB1113Dist01-02Final.asp
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 26 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
APPENDICES
Alpine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153 0 1
Colusa 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,799 0 1
Del Norte 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,513 0 1
Inyo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,231 0 1
Lassen 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,640 0 1
Mono 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,390 0 1
Napa 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13,913 0 1
Nevada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11,187 0 1
Plumas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,549 0 1
Sierra 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 462 0 1
Trinity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,599 0 1
El Dorado 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 20,358 2 12
Santa Barbara 0 2 2 0 3 3 3 44,076 6 13
Kings 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 16,169 6 14
Placer 0 3 3 0 1 1 2 30,944 6 15
Marin 0 2 2 0 1 1 2 22,451 7 16
Santa Cruz 0 1 1 1 2 3 2 28,120 7 17
Siskiyou 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 5,650 9 18
Shasta 1 0 1 0 3 3 2 21,440 9 19
Calaveras 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 4,930 10 20
Yuba 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 8,427 12 21
Amador 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3,897 13 22
Ventura 2 12 14 1 10 11 13 94,663 13 23
San Luis Obispo 1 6 7 0 0 0 4 26,143 13 24
San Benito 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 7,423 13 25
Mendocino 0 2 2 0 1 1 2 10,923 14 26
Humboldt 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 14,389 14 27
Sutter 0 0 0 0 3 3 2 10,510 14 28
Sonoma 0 7 7 0 10 10 9 52,710 16 29
San Mateo 1 15 16 2 6 8 12 69,796 17 30
Butte 0 4 4 0 5 5 5 23,721 19 31
Santa Clara 2 37 39 1 29 30 35 176,259 20 32
Orange 17 67 84 3 57 60 72 320,477 22 33
Solano 0 10 10 3 10 13 12 50,943 23 34
Fresno 2 26 28 3 25 28 28 114,017 25 35
Riverside 3 60 63 3 36 39 51 207,594 25 36
Stanislaus 3 16 19 0 13 13 16 63,437 25 37
Tuolumne 0 2 2 0 1 1 2 5,858 26 38
Glenn 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 3,900 26 39
Mariposa 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1,936 26 40
Tehema 0 2 2 0 2 2 2 7,487 27 41
Madera 1 3 4 0 5 5 5 16,505 27 42
Yolo 0 6 6 0 5 5 6 19,251 29 43
Contra Costa 3 26 29 5 31 36 33 112,635 29 44
Tulare 3 18 21 2 11 13 17 55,519 31 45
Imperial 0 6 6 0 7 7 7 21,076 31 46
San Joaquin 5 18 23 1 25 26 25 79,098 31 47
Merced 5 9 14 0 7 7 11 32,747 32 48
Kern 1 33 34 2 26 28 31 94,013 33 49
Lake 1 0 1 0 4 4 3 7,022 36 50
San Bernardino 11 71 82 5 88 93 88 245,111 36 51
San Diego 2 114 116 7 113 120 118 312,211 38 52
Modoc 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1,261 40 53
Sacramento 4 50 54 5 60 65 60 149,652 40 54
Alameda 4 61 65 4 70 74 70 151,546 46 55
Monterey 2 20 22 4 22 26 24 49,334 49 56
Los Angeles 98 453 551 102 497 599 575 1,128,298 51 57
San Francisco 2 28 30 4 34 38 34 49,605 69 58
Source: California Department of Health Services, EPIC Branch. Source for Fatal: California Dept of Health Services, Vital Statistics Death Statistical Master
File; Source for Nonfatal: California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, Patient Discharge Data.
FATAL
ASSAULTS
COUNTY NONFATAL
HOSPITALIZED
ASSAULTS
TOTAL 1999 FATAL
ASSAULTS
NONFATAL
HOSPITALIZED
ASSAULTS
TOTAL 2000 AVERAGE
1999-2000
POPULATION
10-17 yrs. old
(2000)
RATE PER
100,000
10-17 yrs. old
STATE RANK
(out of 58)
1999 2000
APPENDIX A ? ASSAULT VICTIMIZATION 1999-2000, AGES 10-17, STATEWIDE
Choices for Youth
Page 27
APPENDICES
1999 2000
COUNTY FATAL NONFATAL TOTAL 1999 FATAL NONFATAL TOTAL 2000 AVERAGE POPULATION RATE PER STATE RANK
INJURIES INJURIES INJURIES INJURIES 1999-2000 10-17 yrs. old 100,000 (out of 58)
(2000) 10-17 yrs. old
Alpine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153 0 1
Modoc 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,261 0 1
Mono 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,390 0 1
Sierra 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 462 0 1
Trinity 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,599 0 1
Napa 0 1 1 0 2 2 2 13,913 11 6
Lassen 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3,640 14 7
Yolo 1 3 4 0 3 3 4 19,251 18 8
Sutter 0 2 2 1 1 2 2 10,510 19 9
Plumas 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2,549 20 10
Tulare 2 15 17 0 7 7 12 55,519 22 11
Placer 0 4 4 2 9 11 8 30,944 24 12
Merced 1 5 6 1 9 10 8 32,747 24 13
Glenn 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 3,900 26 14
Mariposa 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1,936 26 15
Imperial 0 7 7 2 2 4 6 21,076 26 16
Kern 1 32 33 1 18 19 26 94,013 28 17
San Benito 0 1 1 0 4 4 3 7,423 34 18
Solano 1 11 12 1 22 23 18 50,943 34 19
Fresno 3 44 47 3 29 32 40 114,017 35 20
Colusa 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 2,799 36 21
Madera 0 7 7 1 4 5 6 16,505 36 22
Ventura 0 31 31 0 39 39 35 94,663 37 23
Sacramento 0 41 41 6 66 72 57 149,652 38 24
Tehema 0 2 2 0 4 4 3 7,487 40 25
Los Angeles 25 407 432 25 455 480 456 1,128,298 40 26
Calaveras 0 2 2 0 2 2 2 4,930 41 27
Santa Barbara 1 15 16 0 21 21 19 44,076 42 28
Kings 1 9 10 0 4 4 7 16,169 43 29
Nevada 0 4 4 0 6 6 5 11,187 45 30
Butte 1 8 9 2 11 13 11 23,721 46 31
Riverside 4 60 64 3 126 129 97 207,594 46 32
Yuba 0 3 3 0 5 5 4 8,427 47 33
San Joaquin 2 32 34 3 40 43 39 79,098 49 34
Lake 0 2 2 0 5 5 4 7,022 50 35
San Francisco 1 17 18 1 31 32 25 49,605 50 36
San Bernardino 4 91 95 6 147 153 124 245,111 51 37
Santa Cruz 0 12 12 1 16 17 15 28,120 52 38
El Dorado 2 3 5 4 12 16 11 20,358 52 39
Contra Costa 7 40 47 3 69 72 60 112,635 53 40
Siskiyou 0 3 3 0 3 3 3 5,650 53 41
Marin 0 12 12 0 12 12 12 22,451 53 42
Sonoma 2 16 18 3 36 39 29 52,710 54 43
Mendocino 0 4 4 2 6 8 6 10,923 55 44
Shasta 0 13 13 0 11 11 12 21,440 56 45
San Diego 7 153 160 6 209 215 188 312,211 60 46
Orange 5 155 160 4 221 225 193 320,477 60 47
Humboldt 1 8 9 0 9 9 9 14,389 63 48
Monterey 0 31 31 0 35 35 33 49,334 67 49
Inyo 0 1 1 0 2 2 2 2,231 67 50
Amador 0 4 4 0 2 2 3 3,897 77 51
San Mateo 1 55 56 4 59 63 60 69,796 85 52
Del Norte 0 3 3 0 3 3 3 3,513 85 53
Santa Clara 4 102 106 4 218 222 164 176,259 93 54
Tuolumne 0 5 5 0 8 8 7 5,858 111 55
Alameda 3 159 162 2 186 188 175 151,546 115 56
San Luis Obispo 0 23 23 0 38 38 31 26,143 117 57
Stanislaus 4 73 77 2 75 77 77 63,437 121 58
APPENDIX B ? SELF-INFLICTED INJURY 1999-2000, AGES 10-17, STATEWIDE
Source: California Department of Health Services, EPIC Branch. Source for Fatal: California Dept of Health Services, Vital Statistics Death Statistical Master
File; Source for Nonfatal: CA Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 28 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
APPENDICES
Ventura 2 12 14 1 10 11 12.5 94,663 13 23
San Mateo 1 15 16 2 6 8 12 69,796 17 30
Santa Clara 2 37 39 1 29 30 34.5 176,259 20 32
Orange 17 67 84 3 57 60 72 320,477 22 33
Fresno 2 26 28 3 25 28 28 114,017 25 35
Riverside 3 60 63 3 36 39 51 207,594 25 36
Contra Costa 3 26 29 5 31 36 32.5 112,635 29 44
San Joaquin 5 18 23 1 25 26 24.5 79,098 31 47
Kern 1 33 34 2 26 28 31 94,013 33 49
San Bernardino 11 71 82 5 88 93 87.5 245,111 36 51
San Diego 2 114 116 7 113 120 118 312,211 38 52
Sacramento 4 50 54 5 60 65 59.5 149,652 40 54
Alameda 4 61 65 4 70 74 69.5 151,546 46 55
Los Angeles 98 453 551 102 497 599 575 1,128,298 51 57
San Francisco 2 28 30 4 34 38 34 49,605 69 58
Source: California Department of Health Services, EPIC Branch. Source for Fatal: California Dept of Health Services, Vital Statistics Death Statistical Master
File; Source for Nonfatal: California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, Patient Discharge Data.
Source: California Department of Health Services, EPIC Branch. Source for Fatal: California Dept of Health Services, Vital Statistics Death Statistical Master
File; Source for Nonfatal: CA Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development
1999 2000
COUNTY FATAL NONFATAL TOTAL 1999 FATAL NONFATAL TOTAL 2000 AVERAGE POPULATION RATE PER STATE RANK
INJURIES INJURIES INJURIES INJURIES 1999-2000 10-17 yrs. old 100,000
(2000) 10-17 yrs. old
Kern 1 32 33 1 18 19 26 94,013 28 17
Fresno 3 44 47 3 29 32 40 114,017 35 20
Ventura 0 31 31 0 39 39 35 94,663 37 23
Sacramento 0 41 41 6 66 72 57 149,652 38 24
Los Angeles 25 407 432 25 455 480 456 1,128,298 40 26
Riverside 4 60 64 3 126 129 97 207,594 46 32
San Joaquin 2 32 34 3 40 43 39 79,098 49 34
San Francisco 1 17 18 1 31 32 25 49,605 50 36
San Bernardino 4 91 95 6 147 153 124 245,111 51 37
Contra Costa 7 40 47 3 69 72 60 112,635 53 40
San Diego 7 153 160 6 209 215 188 312,211 60 46
Orange 5 155 160 4 221 225 193 320,477 60 47
San Mateo 1 55 56 4 59 63 60 69,796 85 52
Santa Clara 4 102 106 4 218 222 164 176,259 93 54
Alameda 3 159 162 2 186 188 175 151,546 115 56
APPENDIX B-1 ? SELF-INFLICTED INJURY 1999-2000, AGES 10-17, LARGEST 15 COUNTIES
1999 2000
FATAL
ASSAULTS
COUNTY NONFATAL
ASSAULTS
TOTAL 1999 FATAL
ASSAULTS
NONFATAL
ASSAULTS
TOTAL 2000 AVERAGE
1999-2000
POPULATION
10-17 yrs. old
(2000)
RATE PER
100,000
10-17 yrs. old
STATE RANK
APPENDIX A-1 ? ASSAULT VICTIMIZATION 1999-2000, AGES 10-17, LARGEST 15 COUNTIES
APPENDICES
Choices for Youth
Page 29
San Francisco 554 1
San Joaquin 753 10
San Diego 801 13
San Bernardino 895 22
Los Angeles 908 23
Riverside 968 25
Sacramento 1003 28
Kern 1007 29
Ventura 1043 32
Alameda 1062 34
San Mateo 1087 35
Fresno 1095 36
Santa Clara 1235 45
Contra Costa 1344 49
Orange 1641 54
AVG. NUMBER OF STUDENTS
PER COUNSELOR
COUNTY STATE RANK
Source: California Dept of Education, Data prepared by Children Now,
County Data Book 2001
Source: California Dept of Education, Data prepared by Children Now, County
Data Book 2001
COUNTY AVG. NUMBER OF STUDENTS
PER COUNSELOR
STATE RANK
(out of 57)
San Francisco 554 1
Trinity 625 2
Amador 665 3
Yolo 672 4
Mariposa 680 5
San Luis Obispo 706 6
Imperial 709 7
Glenn 718 8
Sonoma 730 9
San Joaquin 753 10
Marin 782 11
Inyo 790 12
San Diego 801 13
El Dorado 812 14
Humboldt 823 15
Nevada 861 16
Colusa 862 17
Mendocino 864 18
Butte 879 19
Shasta 888 20
Tehama 893 21
San Bernardino 895 22
Los Angeles 908 23
Siskiyou 925 24
Riverside 968 25
Monterey 971 26
Lake 987 27
Sacramento 1003 28
Kern 1007 29
Sutter 1008 30
Kings 1038 31
Ventura 1043 32
Placer 1060 33
Alameda 1062 34
San Mateo 1087 35
Fresno 1095 36
Tuolumne 1106 37
Solano 1121 38
Santa Cruz 1165 39
Mono 1170 40
Lassen 1181 41
Madera 1185 42
Stanislaus 1196 43
Napa 1196 44
Santa Clara 1235 45
Santa Barbara 1235 46
Merced 1290 47
Tulare 1315 48
Contra Costa 1344 49
Plumas 1374 50
San Benito 1491 51
Del Norte 1520 52
Modoc 1600 53
Orange 1641 54
Yuba 1701 55
Sierra 1980 56
Calaveras 2642 57
Alpine n/a n/a
APPENDIX C ? STUDENT COUNSELOR RATIO, K-12
1998-2001, STATEWIDE
APPENDIX C-1 ? STUDENT COUNSELOR RATIO, K-12
1998-2001, LARGEST 15 COUNTIES
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 30 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
COUNTY ADP 2000 ADP 2001 AVERAGE POPULATION RATE PER 100,000 STATE RANK
(2000-01) 10-17 yrs. old (2000) 10-17 yrs. old (out of 58)
Alpine 0 n/a 0 153 0 1
Calaveras 0 n/a 0 4,930 0 1
Colusa 0 0 0 2,799 0 1
Modoc 0 n/a 0 1,261 0 1
Sierra 0 0 0 462 0 1
Sutter 0 n/a 0 10,510 0 1
Tuolumne 0 0 0 5,858 0 1
Plumas 0.3 0 0.2 2,549 6 8
Amador 0 0.5 0.3 3,897 6 9
Mariposa 0.3 0.3 0.3 1,936 15 10
Mono 0.4 0.2 0.3 1,390 22 11
Marin 21.8 28.5 25.2 22,451 112 12
San Luis Obispo 27.6 33.6 30.6 26,143 117 13
Santa Cruz 35.9 36.6 36.3 28,120 129 14
Ventura 126.9 117.7 122.3 94,663 129 15
Merced 43.2 43.9 43.6 32,747 133 16
Placer 40.3 45.8 43.1 30,944 139 17
Contra Costa 167.1 151.3 159.2 112,635 141 18
Nevada 16 15.9 16 11,187 143 19
Kern 131 138.1 134.6 94,013 143 20
San Diego 434.1 470.4 452.3 312,211 145 21
Orange 482.9 463.8 473.4 320,477 148 22
Sonoma 93.7 70.4 82.1 52,710 156 23
Stanislaus 94.7 106.4 100.6 63,437 159 24
Solano 81.8 81.8 81.8 50,943 161 25
Los Angeles 1,836.8 1,802.7 1819.8 1,128,298 161 26
Riverside 344.3 338.6 341.5 207,594 164 27
Santa Barbara 72.7 77.6 75.2 44,076 171 28
Santa Clara 314.5 311.2 312.9 176,259 177 29
Yolo 34.5 37.6 36.1 19,251 187 30
San Joaquin 154.6 144 149.3 79,098 189 31
Alameda 290.9 289.8 290.4 151,546 192 32
El Dorado 41.1 42.6 41.9 20,358 206 33
Sacramento 302.7 321 311.9 149,652 208 34
San Benito 17.7 13.3 15.5 7,423 209 35
San Bernardino 538.8 492.6 515.7 245,111 210 36
San Mateo 161.7 137 149.4 69,796 214 37
Monterey 116.7 96.9 106.8 49,334 216 38
Madera 38.4 33.1 35.8 16,505 217 39
Napa 32.1 29.8 31 13,913 222 40
Imperial 46.6 47.7 47.2 21,076 224 41
Tulare 130.6 123 126.8 55,519 228 42
San Francisco 122.9 114.8 118.9 49,605 240 43
Siskiyou 15.2 12.8 14 5,650 248 44
Fresno 280.4 297.2 288.8 114,017 253 45
Butte 61.5 59.3 60.4 23,721 255 46
Shasta 56.3 54.8 55.6 21,440 259 47
Glenn 10.9 12 11.5 3,900 294 48
Trinity 3.3 6.1 4.7 1,599 294 49
Mendocino 29.9 34.9 32.4 10,923 297 50
Tehama 22.6 22.4 22.5 7,487 301 51
Humboldt 44.9 46.6 45.8 14,389 318 52
Del Norte 11 12.1 11.6 3,513 329 53
Kings 60 56.3 58.2 16,169 360 54
Lake 30.9 31.1 31 7,022 441 55
Inyo 9.7 10.3 10 2,231 448 56
Lassen 16.7 19.3 18 3,640 495 57
Yuba 40.8 44.8 42.8 8,427 508 58
APPENDIX D ? INCARCERATION OF YOUTH 10-17, AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION (ADP) 2000-01, STATEWIDE
Source: California Board of Corrections, Facilities Standards and Operations Division
APPENDICES
Choices for Youth
Page 31
COUNTY ADP 2000 ADP 2001 AVERAGE POPULATION RATE PER 100,000 STATE RANK
2000-01 10-17 yrs. old (2000) 10-17 yrs. old
Ventura 126.9 117.7 122.3 94,663 129 15
Contra Costa 167.1 151.3 159.2 112,635 141 18
Kern 131 138.1 134.6 94,013 143 20
San Diego 434.1 470.4 452.3 312,211 145 21
Orange 482.9 463.8 473.4 320,477 148 22
Los Angeles 1,836.8 1,802.7 1819.8 1,128,298 161 26
Riverside 344.3 338.6 341.5 207,594 164 27
Santa Clara 314.5 311.2 312.9 176,259 177 29
San Joaquin 154.6 144 149.3 79,098 189 31
Alameda 290.9 289.8 290.4 151,546 192 32
Sacramento 302.7 321 311.9 149,652 208 34
San Bernardino 538.8 492.6 515.7 245,111 210 36
San Mateo 161.7 137 149.4 69,796 214 37
San Francisco 122.9 114.8 118.9 49,605 240 43
Fresno 280.4 297.2 288.8 114,017 253 45
Source: California Board of Corrections, Facilities Standards and Operations Division
APPENDICES
APPENDIX D-1 ? INCARCERATION OF YOUTH 10-17, AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION (ADP) 2000-01,
LARGEST 15 COUNTIES
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 32 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
APPENDICES
Mono 64 58.7% 1
San Francisco 2,151 58.4% 2
Marin 843 49.2% 3
Santa Clara 6,026 45.2% 4
San Mateo 2,124 43.8% 5
Contra Costa 3,756 43.6% 6
Nevada 428 43% 7
Plumas 97 41.5% 8
Trinity 64 41.2% 9
El Dorado 715 40.7% 10
Sonoma 1,461 39.8% 11
Santa Barbara 1,302 39.8% 12
Alameda 4,238 39% 13
Placer 1,226 38.6% 14
San Diego 9,243 37.9% 15
Siskiyou 189 37.9% 16
Ventura 2,736 37.4% 17
Sierra 36 37.3% 18
San Luis Obispo 801 36.2% 19
Yolo 551 36.1% 20
Orange 9,929 35.4% 21
San Benito 204 35.1% 22
Napa 394 34.8% 23
Los Angeles 28,495 34.7% 24
Calaveras 153 34.1% 25
Sacramento 3,517 33.3% 26
Tehama 194 33.3% 26
Humboldt 447 33% 28
Tuolumne 165 32.9% 29
Santa Cruz 709 32.7% 30
Fresno 2,865 32.4% 31
Butte 612 32.3% 32
Inyo 73 31.7% 33
Shasta 546 30.9% 34
Madera 363 30.7% 35
Riverside 4,481 30.2% 36
Mendocino 301 30% 37
San Joaquin 1,680 29.8% 38
Solano 1,160 29.7% 39
Glenn 100 29.6% 40
Monterey 932 28.9% 41
Lake 155 28.9% 42
Modoc 39 28.8% 43
Kings 328 28.7% 44
Lassen 88 27.6% 45
Tulare 1,128 26.4% 46
Merced 707 25.3% 47
San Bernardino 4,443 25.1% 48
Stanislaus 1,245 24.2% 49
Del Norte 64 23.5% 50
Amador 87 23.3% 51
Sutter 204 22% 52
Mariposa 34 21.2% 53
Kern 1,553 20.3% 54
Imperial 344 20.1% 55
Colusa 61 19.5% 56
Yuba 79 14.2% 57
Alpine n/a n/a n/a
COUNTY AVERAGE % GRADS
COMPLETED
UC/CSU Requirements
1997-2000
STATE RANK
(out of 57)
San Francisco 2,151 58.4% 2
Santa Clara 6,026 45.2% 4
San Mateo 2,124 43.8% 5
Contra Costa 3,756 43.6% 6
Alameda 4,238 39% 13
San Diego 9,243 37.9% 15
Ventura 2,736 37.4% 17
Orange 9,929 35.4% 21
Los Angeles 28,495 34.7% 24
Sacramento 3,517 33.3% 26
Fresno 2,865 32.4% 31
Riverside 4,481 30.2% 36
San Joaquin 1,680 29.8% 38
San Bernardino 4,443 25.1% 48
Kern 1,553 20.3% 54
AVERAGE HIGH
SCHOOL GRADS
COMPLETED
UC/CSU
Requirements
1997-2000
AVERAGE %
GRADS
COMPLETED
UC/CSU
Requirements
1997-2000
STATE RANK AVG. HIGH SCHOOL
GRADS COMPLETED
UC/CSU Requirements
1997-2000
COUNTY
Source: Children Now, County Data Book 2001, from California Department
of Education, Dataquest
Source: Children Now, County Data Book 2001, from California
Department of Education, Dataquest
APPENDIX E ? HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES WHO
COMPLETED UC/CSU REQUIREMENTS,
1997-2000, STATEWIDE
APPENDIX E-1 ? GRADUATES WHO COMPLETED
UC/CSU REQUIREMENTS, 1997-2000,
LARGEST 15 COUNTIES
Choices for Youth
Page 33
APPENDICES
Fresno $2.8M 100% 1.5M / $4.6M 34% 93.8% $270,000 3.2% AAlameda
$5.1M 100% 1.2M / $4.9M 24% 19.5% $1.4M 16.5% B+
Ventura $2.4M /$2.7M 89% $650K / $1.1M 58% 141.9% $230,000 2.7% B
San Joaquin $1.7M / $2M 85% $340K / $690K 49% 47.9% $440,000 5.1% BSan
Diego $9.5M / $10.3M 93% $1.8M / $5.4M 33% 7.2% $1.2M 13.6% BSan
Francisco $2.8M 100% $830K / $3.3M 25% 14.1% 0 0% C+
Los Angeles $27.6M / 35M 79% $4.6M / $12.2M 37% 30.7% $3.1 M 36.1% C+
Riverside $4.9M / $5.4M 92% 1.8M / $5.1M 36% 1.1% $430,000 5.0% C
Santa Clara $5.8M / $6.1M 94% $190K / $5.6M 3% 17.3% $190,000 2.2% C
Sacramento $3.6M / $4.3M 85% 0/ $1.9M 0% 28.6% $530,000 6.2% C
San Mateo $2.6M 100% $0 / $1.4M 0% 3.8% $53,000 0.6% COrange
$7.2M / $10M 72% $870K / $4.1M 21% 5.6% $520,000 6.1% D
San Bernardino $2M / 6M 34% $0 / $4.1M 0% 15.8% $100,000 1.2% D
Contra Costa $863K / 3.3M 26% 1.6M / $4.4M 36% 6.6% $70,000 0.8% D
Kern $1.4M / $2.3M 61% $0 / $1.1M 0% n/a $55,000 0.6% D
COUNTY CRIME PREVENTION
Percentage of Crime
Prevention Act funding that
goes to prevention vs.
enforcement or suppression
(2000-01)
County
Funding:
% of Total
% of
County Total
Dollars available to
high schools/ Total
County Dollars
Prevention $$/
Total county
funding
AFTER-SCHOOL
Percentage of funding available to
high school youth (of grants
allocated in 2000 and 2001)
JOB TRAINING
Percentage of youth who
potentially gained job
experience through the
federal job training program
(1999-2000)
MENTORING
Percentage of state
mentoring grants awarded
to each county (1998-2001)
GRADE
Sources: CA Board of Corrections; US Dept of Education; US Census and WIA Annual Report 2000; CA Governor's Mentoring Partnership
APPENDIX F ? AVAILABILITY OF CHOICES FOR YOUTH
% to
prevention
programs
$ out of
$8.5 million
total 1998-
2001
COUNTY TOTAL JJCPA ALLOCATION 2000-01 PREVENTION SPECIFIC ALLOCATION % FOR PREVENTION PROGRAMS
California Board of Corrections As determined by prevention review panel
Alameda $5,137,007 $5,137,007 100%
Fresno $2,844,156 $2,844,156 100%
San Francisco $2,831,068 $2,831,068 100%
San Mateo $2,579,349 $2,579,349 100%
Santa Clara $6,135,582 $5,775,582 94%
San Diego $10,285,141 $9,535,141 93%
Riverside $5,379,912 $4,946,865 92%
Ventura $2,672,098 $2,378,498 89%
San Joaquin $2,001,248 $1,709,009 85%
Sacramento $4,272,743 $3,647,743 85%
Los Angeles $34,917,974 $27,625,071 79%
Orange $9,991,843 $7,193,130 72%
Kern $2,327,753 $1,426,385 61%
San Bernardino $5,969,476 $2,035,602 34%
Contra Costa $3,285,543 $862,543 26%
Source: CA Board of Corrections
APPENDIX G ? JUVENILE JUSTICE AND CRIME PREVENTION ACT: PREVENTION PROGRAMS
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 34 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
ALAMEDA
2000 Oakland Unified School District* $500,000 24%
2000 Oakland Unified School District $405,168
2000 Oakland Unified School District* $703,000
2000 Oakland Unified School District $375,000
2000 Oakland Unified School District $268,517
2001 San Leandro Unified School District $419,703
2001 Oakland Unified School District $304,731
2001 Berkeley Unified School District $549,024
2001 Hayward Unified School District $1,386,417
Total Funded Amount $4,911,560
CONTRA COSTA
2000 West Contra Costa Unified School District* $500,000 36%
2000 West Contra Costa Unified School District $507,989
2000 West Contra Costa Unified School District $182,076
2000 Mount Diablo Unified School District $818,843
2001 Pittsburg Unified School District* $1,072,279
2001 West Contra Costa Unified School District $790,024
2001 Antioch Middle School $245,808
2001 Byron Union School District $263,919
Total Funded Amount $4,380,938
FRESNO
2000 West Park School District $163,537 34%
2000 Fresno County Office of Education $1,050,000
2000 Fresno Unified School District $757,633
2000 West Fresno Elementary School District $230,447
2000 Sanger Unified School District $291,503
2000 Coalinga-Huron Unified School District $360,000
2001 Fresno Unified School District* $649,834
2001 New Millennium Institute of Education* $442,450
2001 Raisin City Elementary School District $199,089
2001 Sierra Unified School District* $453,325
Total Funded Amount $4,597,818
KERN
2000 Bakersfield City School District $136,728 0%
2000 Greenfield Unified School District $996,543
Total Funded Amount $1,133,271
LOS ANGELES
2000 LA Unified School District $148,411 37%
2000 LAUSD: Wilton Place Elementary $600,000
2000 LA Unified School District* $1,684,442
2000 LA County Office of Education* $1,890,577
2000 Pasadena Unified School District* $977,413
2000 Long Beach Unified School District $468,288
2000 Montebello Unified School District $530,251
2000 ABC Unified School District $518,023
2001 Bellflower Unified School District $401,002
2001 Compton Unified School District $250,000
2001 Rowland Unified School District $847,652
2001 LA Unified School District $150,000
2001 The Accelerated Charter School $132,810
2001 LA Unified School District $600,000
2001 Virginia Road Elementary $116,460
2001 LA Unified School District $715,477
2001 LA Unified School District $876,748
2001 El Rancho Unified School District $391,394
2001 Long Beach Unified School District $661,729
2001 Duarte Unified School District $199,500
Total Funded Amount $12,160,177
ORANGE
2000 Anaheim City School District $1,188,606 21%
2000 Santa Ana Unified School District $600,000
2001 Fullerton School District $611,537
APPENDICES
COUNTY YEAR OF GRANT SCHOOL DISTRICT FUNDED AMOUNT % OF COUNTY FUNDS THAT
INCLUDE HIGH SCHOOLS
*Grants include high school youth. Source: US Dept of Education
APPENDIX H ? 21ST CENTURY LEARNING CENTER GRANTS: LARGEST 15 COUNTIES, 2000-2001 (COHORTS 4-7)
Choices for Youth
Page 35
APPENDICES
ORANGE, CONTINUED
2001 Ocean View School District $225,000
2001 Orange County Superintendent of Schools* $872,438
2001 Capistrano Unified School District $645,000
Total Funded Amount $4,142,581
RIVERSIDE
2000 Jurupa Unified School District* $625,759 36%
2000 Jurupa Unified School District $362,842
2000 Corona-Norco Unified School District $375,000
2001 Riverside Unified School District $1,125,000
2001 Upland Unified School District $171,060
2001 Hemet Unified School District* $1,075,094
2001 Corona-Norco Unified School District $875,000
2001 Val Verde Unified School District $392,522
2001 Hemet Unified School District* $127,739
Total Funded Amount $5,130,016
SACRAMENTO
2001 San Juan Unified School District $787,780 0%
2001 Elk Grove Unified School District $1,096,290
Total Funded Amount $1,884,070
SAN BERNARDINO
2000 Ontario-Montclair School District $125,000 0%
2001 SB City Unified School District $2,138,096
2001 SB City Unified School District $1,084,908
2001 Apple Valley Unified School District $150,468
2001 Ontario-Montclair School District $596,640
Total Funded Amount $4,095,112
SANTA CLARA
2000 Mount Pleasant Elementary District $875,561 3%
2000 Alum Rock Union Elementary School District $381,734
2001 Franklin-McKinley School District $3,293,013
2001 Campbell Union School District $875,000
2001 East Side Union High School District* $193,450
Total Funded Amount $5,618,758
SAN DIEGO
2000 SD Unified School District* $171,696 33%
2000 Sweetwater Union High School District* $397,465
2000 National School District $632,337
2000 San Ysidro Elementary School District $750,000
2000 Oceanside Unified School District $452,023
2000 Mountain Empire Unified School District* $1,182,492
2001 SD Unified School District $1,600,000
2001 SD Unified School District $195,190
Total Funded Amount $5,381,203
SAN FRANCISCO
2001 SF Unified School District* $828,575 25%
2001 SF Unified School District $2,500,000
Total Funded Amount $3,328,575
SAN JOAQUIN
2000 Golden Plains Unified School District* $339,259 49%
2001 Lodi Unified School District $349,206
Total Funded Amount $688,465
SAN MATEO
2000 Garfield Charter School $145,425 0%
2000 Redwood City School District $675,000
2001 Ravenswood City School District $540,000
Total Funded Amount $1,360,425
VENTURA
2000 Santa Paula Union High School District* $257,000 58%
2001 Moorpark Unified School District* $389,619
2001 Hueneme Elementary School District $472,610
Total Funded Amount $1,119,229
TOTAL 21ST CENTURY FUNDING 2000-01 FOR 15 COUNTIES: $59,932,198
*Grants include high school youth. Source: US Dept of Education
COUNTY YEAR OF GRANT SCHOOL DISTRICT FUNDED AMOUNT % OF COUNTY FUNDS THAT
INCLUDE HIGH SCHOOLS
APPENDIX H ? 21ST CENTURY LEARNING CENTER GRANTS: LARGEST 15 COUNTIES, 2000-2001 (COHORTS 4-7)
Youth Violence Prevention Scorecard
Page 36 WWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.ORG
APPENDICES
COUNTY POPULATION
16-19 yrs. old
UNEMPLOYED OR NOT
IN SCHOOL
16-19 yrs. old
% UNEMPLOYED OR
NOT IN SCHOOL
16-19 yrs. old
YOUTH WIA SERVED*
14-18 yrs. old
% OF UNEMPLOYED
YOUTH SERVED
BY WIA
# OF LWIBS
(Local Workforce
Investment Boards)
SOURCE US Census
2000 Profile of
Selected Economic
Characteristics: 2000
US Census
2000 Profile of
Selected Economic
Characteristics: 2000
WIA Annual Report
Program Yr 2000
WIA Annual Report
Program Yr 2000
Ventura 33,364 439 1.3% 623 141.9% 1
Fresno 57,893 3,154 5.5% 2,958 93.8% 1
San Joaquin 31,695 727 2.3% 348 47.9% 1
Los Angeles 527,149 28,201 5.4% 8,646 30.7% 8
Sacramento 77,562 1,529 2% 438 28.6% 1
Alameda 68,264 1,747 2.6% 341 19.5% 2
Santa Clara 80,086 3,313 4.1% 572 17.3% 2
San Bernardino 108,647 6,145 5.7% 971 15.8% 2
San Francisco 24,261 1,211 5% 171 14.1% 1
San Diego 140,663 9,424 6.7% 677 7.2% 1
Contra Costa 51,284 3,481 6.8% 229 6.6% 2
Orange 150,362 8,242 5.5% 458 5.6% 3
San Mateo 37,255 958 2.6% 36 3.8% 1
Riverside 91,901 4,416 4.8% 47 1.1% 1
Kern 39,712 1,510 3.8% n/a** n/a** 1
* Funding data only available for the 15 largest counties (provided by the Governor's Mentoring Partnership)
Los Angeles $2,964,810 $27,500 $84,376 $3,076,686 36.1%
Alameda $1,293,838 $55,000 $53,438 $1,402,276 16.5%
San Diego $1,068,025 $27,500 $62,813 $1,158,338 13.6%
Sacramento $324,800 $110,000 $92,813 $527,613 6.2%
Orange $500,000 $0 $22,500 $522,500 6.1%
San Joaquin $437,500 $0 $0 $437,500 5.1%
Riverside $399,855 $0 $28,125 $427,980 5%
Fresno $175,000 $55,000 $42,188 $272,188 3.2%
Ventura $225,000 $0 $7,500 $232,500 2.7%
Santa Clara $160,379 $0 $28,125 $188,504 2.2%
San Bernardino $100,000 $0 $0 $100,000 1.2%
Contra Costa $0 $0 $70,313 $70,313 0.8%
Kern $0 $55,000 $0 $55,000 0.7%
San Mateo $0 $0 $52,632 $52,632 0.6%
San Francisco $0 $0 $0 $0 0%
TOTAL $7,649,207 $330,000 $544,823 $8,524,030 100%
Funding per county % of total funds awarded
to largest 15 counties*
* Local Workforce Investment Boards were aggregated by county.
Los Angeles: Carson, Lomita and Torrance; Foothill; Long Beach; LA City; LA County; South Bay; SELACO; Verdugo
Alameda: Alameda; Oakland
Santa Clara: NOVA; San Jose
San Bernardino: San Bernardino City; San Bernardino County
Contra Costa: Contra Costa; Richmond
Orange: Anaheim; Orange; Santa Ana
** WIA data for Kern included Inyo and Mono counties
COUNTY OFFICE OF SECRETARY
OF EDUCATION FUNDING
1999-2001
DEPT OF ALCOHOL AND
DRUG FUNDING
(Friday Night Live)
1998-2001
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY SERVICES
AND DEVELOPMENT
FUNDING
2000-01
TOTAL
APPENDIX J ? MENTORING DATA
APPENDIX I ? FEDERAL JOB TRAINING, WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT (WIA)
Copies of this report
are available at
www.preventviolence.org
or by contacting:
i.e. communications, LLC
785 Market St., 16th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
Tel: 415.616.3930
Fax: 415.616.3925
Design: Natalie Kitamura Design; Printing: UTAP Printing


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