Parental Involvement: Title I, Part A

April 23, 2004

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................ 1
PURPOSE............................................................................................................................ 2
A. GENERAL INFORMATION.................................................................................... 3
A-1. What is parental involvement under No Child Left Behind? ......................... 3
A-2. What is the significance of the statutory definition?...................................... 3
A-3. Who is a parent for the purposes of Title I, Part A?...................................... 3
A-4. Why is parental involvement important? ....................................................... 3
A-5. What does the research show about how family involvement in children?s
education affects student achievement?......................................................... 4
A-6. What are the key Title I, Part A parental notice requirements?.................... 4
A-7. What are the parental involvement provisions in section 1118 of the ESEA?
........................................................................................................................ 4
A-8. How must SEAs, LEAs, and schools communicate with parents in general? 4
A-9. What is meant by providing information to parents with limited English
proficiency, ?to the extent practicable,? in a language parents can
understand?.................................................................................................... 5
A-10. How must an SEA, LEA, or school communicate with parents with
disabilities to ensure meaningful participation in Title I, Part A programs? 5
A-11. What Federal civil rights provisions are applicable to parental involvement
activities? ....................................................................................................... 6
A-12. May an SEA or LEA use funds from other Federal programs for activities
related to parental involvement? ................................................................... 6
A-13. What are Parental Information and Resource Centers? ............................... 6
A-14. What other resources and research are available to help improve parental
involvement? .................................................................................................. 7
B. RESPONSIBILITIES OF STATES........................................................................... 8
General SEA Responsibilities for Parental Involvement........................................... 8
B-1. What parental involvement provisions are included in State plans?............. 8
B-2. Must an SEA consult with parents in the development of the State plan?..... 8
B-3. What responsibility does an SEA have with respect to the parental
involvement provisions in local plans?.......................................................... 8
B-4. May an SEA use the Title I, Part A funds it reserves for State administration
to meet its parental involvement responsibilities?......................................... 8
Information Dissemination and Technical Assistance............................................... 8
B-5. What information about LEA and school performance must an SEA
disseminate to parents?.................................................................................. 8
B-6. What information about individual student academic assessment must SEAs
provide to parents? ........................................................................................ 9
Progress Reviews ....................................................................................................... 9
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B-7. What are an SEA?s responsibilities for reviewing and disseminating
information about the progress of an LEA?s parental involvement activities?
........................................................................................................................ 9
SEA Notification to Parents of Children in an LEA or School Identified for
Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring ................................................... 9
B-8. How must an SEA, LEA or school communicate with parents during the
school improvement process? ........................................................................ 9
B-9. What are an SEA?s responsibilities regarding notification to parents of
children in an LEA identified for improvement or corrective action?......... 10
SEA Technical Assistance to an LEA or School in Need of Improvement............. 10
B-10. What technical assistance related to parental involvement must an SEA
provide for LEAs and schools in need of improvement? ............................. 10
C. LEA RESPONSIBILITIES...................................................................................... 11
General..................................................................................................................... 11
C-1. Are the parental involvement provisions in section 1118 of the ESEA
applicable to LEAs?..................................................................................... 11
C-2. What is the basic parental involvement requirement under Title I, Part A for
LEAs?........................................................................................................... 11
C-3. What specific information must an LEA?s written parental involvement
policy contain?............................................................................................. 11
C-4. What is the relationship between the local plan an LEA submits to its SEA
and the LEA?s written parental involvement policy?................................... 12
C-5. What other information related to parents must an LEA include in its local
plan under section 1112?............................................................................. 12
C-6. What information must LEAs provide parents about the teachers and
paraprofessionals who work with their children? ....................................... 12
C-7. What information must LEAs provide to parents in the LEA report card
about the performance of their child?s school to assist parents in making
decisions about their children?s education? ................................................ 13
C-8. What information must all LEAs receiving Title I, Part A funds provide to
parents of limited English proficient students? ........................................... 13
C-9. What notice and information must LEAs with Title I, Part A-funded language
instruction educational programs provide to parents of limited English
proficient students?...................................................................................... 14
C-10. What information must LEAs provide to parents of a child with a disability
who is in a language instruction educational program? ............................. 15
C-11. Do parents of private school children in Title I, Part A programs have the
right to equitable participation in parental involvement activities? ........... 15
C-12. What responsibilities do LEAs have to parents with respect to complaint
procedures relating to violations of Title I, Part A requirements? ............. 16
LEA Funding for Parental Involvement .................................................................. 16
C-13. What funds must an LEA reserve for parental involvement activities under
section 1118? ............................................................................................... 16
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C-14. Do the parental involvement requirements of section 1118 apply to LEAs
with a Title I, Part A allocation of $500,000 or less?.................................. 16
C-15. How does an LEA determine the amount of funds to be used for parental
involvement activities for parents of private school children participating in
Title I, Part A activities?.............................................................................. 17
C-16. What amount of funds must an LEA allot to schools for parental involvement
activities under section 1118? ..................................................................... 17
C-17. On what basis may an LEA distribute to schools served under Title I, Part
A, the funds it has reserved for schools to carry out the parental involvement
provisions of section 1118? ......................................................................... 18
C-18. What input do parents have in how an LEA allots to schools the funds the
LEA has reserved for parental involvement?............................................... 18
C-19. If an LEA reserves more than the required one percent of its Title I, Part A
funds for parental involvement, must 95 percent of the entire amount
reserved be distributed to schools served under Title I, Part A?................. 18
LEA Responsibilities for School Improvement....................................................... 19
C-20. In reviewing annually the progress of each school, what must an LEA
communicate to parents, teachers, principals, schools, and the community?
19
C-21. What is an LEA responsible for communicating to parents of the children of
a school identified for school improvement, for corrective action, or for
restructuring? .............................................................................................. 19
C-22. What information about actions taken to address problems that led to a
school?s identification for school improvement, for corrective action, or for
restructuring must an LEA provide to both parents and the public? .......... 20
C-23. What opportunities do the principal and parents of a school have to present
evidence if they believe that the elementary or secondary school proposed
for identification for improvement, for corrective action, or for restructuring
has been identified in error?........................................................................ 20
C-24. What responsibility does an LEA have regarding the school improvement
plan of an identified school?........................................................................ 20
C-25. What responsibility does an LEA have for providing technical assistance
related to parental involvement to a school identified for school
improvement?............................................................................................... 21
C-26. What responsibilities to parents does an LEA have with respect to
supplemental educational services? ............................................................ 21
C-27. What responsibilities does an LEA have to parents of the children in a
school that is in the restructuring phase of school improvement? .............. 22
D. SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................................. 22
School-level Parental Involvement Policies and Funding ....................................... 22
D-1. What written parental involvement policies must Title I, Part A schools
develop? ....................................................................................................... 22
D-2. What notification and dissemination requirements apply for school parental
involvement policies?................................................................................... 22
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D-3. What information do the parents? ?right-to-know? provisions require
schools to provide parents about the qualifications of teachers of their
children who are not highly qualified?........................................................ 23
D-4. How must schools involve parents to improve Title I, Part A programs?... 23
D-5. What meetings must schools hold to inform parents about Title I, Part A
programs and parental involvement? .......................................................... 23
D-6. What information and opportunities must schools provide parents of
children participating in Title I, Part A programs? .................................... 23
D-7. Which parents are eligible to participate in parent involvement activities in
a schoolwide program school? .................................................................... 24
Shared Responsibility for High Student Academic Achievement........................... 24
D-8. What is a "school-parent"compact? ............................................................ 24
D-9. What must a ?school-parent? compact include?......................................... 25
D-10. What information must a school provide to parents about their child?s level
of achievement on the State academic assessment? .................................... 25
Schools in Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring ............................... 25
D-11. Must an LEA pay for or provide transportation to service providers? ....... 25
E. LEA AND SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES TO BUILD PARENT CAPACITY.. 26
Basic Requirement................................................................................................... 26
E-1. How do LEAs and schools build parents? capacity for involvement? ......... 26
Providing Assistance and Training .......................................................................... 26
E-2. On what topics must schools and LEAs provide parents with assistance and
training?....................................................................................................... 26
E-3. Does the LEA, with the assistance of its SEA, have a responsibility to
upgrade the educational levels of parents of participating students,
particularly those parents who do not possess a secondary school diploma?
...................................................................................................................... 26
E-4. What assistance do schools and LEAs provide to help parents work with
their children?.............................................................................................. 27
E-5. Is volunteering in a child?s classroom an activity in which parents can
engage to help share the responsibility for student learning?..................... 27
E-6. What school staff training must schools and LEAs provide related to
parental involvement?.................................................................................. 27
Activities to Strengthen Parental Involvement ........................................................ 28
E-7. How can schools and LEAs maximize parental involvement and
participation in school meetings, conferences, and activities? ................... 28
E-8. May Title I, Part A funds be used to support parents? attendance at
workshops and conferences? ....................................................................... 28
E-9. May a school or all schools within a district use their share(s) of the one
percent reservation for parental involvement under section 1118(a)(3)(C) to
support a district-level parent resource center or some other district-level
activity for parents? ..................................................................................... 28
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Coordination with Other Programs and Community Involvement.......................... 29
E-10. How should schools and LEAs coordinate and conduct parental involvement
activities? ..................................................................................................... 29
E-11. How can schools and LEAs involve the community to help ensure the
effective involvement of parents?................................................................. 29
APPENDIX A: DEFINITIONS ....................................................................................... 30
APPENDIX B: KEY TITLE I, PART A PARENTAL NOTICE REQUIREMENTS34
APPENDIX C: RESEARCH BASED RESOURCES.................................................... 40
APPENDIX D: DISTRICT WIDE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY........... 45
APPENDIX E: SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT ......................................................... 51
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PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
INTRODUCTION
The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB Act) reauthorized the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), and is based on four principles that provide a
framework through which families, educators, and communities can work together to
improve teaching and learning. These principles are accountability for results, local control
and flexibility, expanded parental choice, and effective and successful programs that reflect
scientifically based research. The parental involvement provisions in Title I, Part A of the
ESEA reflect these principles. Specifically, these provisions stress shared accountability
between schools and parents for high student achievement, including expanded public
school choice and supplemental educational services for eligible children in lowperforming
schools, local development of parental involvement plans with sufficient
flexibility to address local needs, and building parents? capacity for using effective
practices to improve their own children?s academic achievement.
New reporting provisions added by the NCLB Act offer parents important insight into their
children?s education, the professional qualifications of their teachers, and the quality of the
schools they attend. The new legislation ensures that parents have the information they
need to make well-informed choices for their children, more effectively share responsibility
with their children?s schools, and help those schools develop effective and successful
academic programs. Parents now will know their children?s academic strengths and
weaknesses and how well schools are performing, and they will have other options and
resources for helping their children if their schools are identified in need of improvement.
The new Title I, Part A is designed not only to help close the achievement gap between
disadvantaged and minority students and their peers, but also to change the culture of
America?s schools so that success is defined in terms of student achievement and schools
invest in every child.1 As indicated by the parental involvement provisions in Title I, Part
A, the involvement of parents in their children?s education and schools is critical to that
process. Secretary Paige put it succinctly when he stated, ?[s]chools can?t improve without
the help of parents.?2
Three decades of research provide convincing evidence that parents are an important
influence in helping their children achieve high academic standards. When schools
collaborate with parents to help their children learn and when parents participate in school
activities and decision-making about their children?s education, children achieve at higher
1 Testing for Results; Helping Families, Schools and Communities Understand and Improve Student
Achievement, US Department of Education, 2002
2 Rod Paige, USA TODAY, April 8, 2002, Page A-13
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levels. In short, when parents are involved in education, children do better in school and
schools improve.3
This guidance is divided into five major sections. The first deals with general issues
related to parental involvement, the second addresses the parental involvement
responsibilities of State educational agencies (SEAs), the third describes responsibilities of
local educational agencies (LEAs), the fourth describes the responsibilities of schools, and
the fifth describes the responsibilities of LEAs and schools to build parents? capacity for
becoming involved in improving their child?s academic achievement. Included in the
appendices are relevant definitions (Appendix A), key Title I, Part A parental notice
requirements (Appendix B), a list of research-based resources for improving teaching and
learning (Appendix C), a sample template that might be used for the development of a
district-wide parental involvement policy (Appendix D), and a sample template for a
school-parent compact (Appendix E).
PURPOSE
The purpose of this guidance is to assist SEAs, LEAs, and schools in administering the
parental involvement provisions of Title I, Part A of the ESEA. This guidance is not
intended to be all-inclusive; rather, it answers questions about and clarifies aspects of the
law that have been brought to the attention of the U.S. Department of Education (ED).
This guidance may be supplemented in the future as other issues arise. The questions are
primarily based on issues raised by State and local school officials and staff, education
leaders, technical assistance providers, parents, parent advocacy organizations, parental
involvement coordinators/liaisons, and others who are actively engaged in working with
parents to improve student achievement and learning.
3 Lewis, Anne C.; Henderson, Anne T., Urgent Message: Families Crucial to School Reform, 1998
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A. GENERAL INFORMATION
A-1. What is parental involvement under No Child Left Behind?
Parental involvement always has been a centerpiece of Title I. However, for the
first time in the history of the ESEA, it has a specific statutory definition. The
statute defines parental involvement as the participation of parents in regular, twoway,
and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other
school activities, including ensuring?| that parents play an integral role in assisting their child?s learning;| that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child?s
education at school;| that parents are full partners in their child?s education and are included,
as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist
in the education of their child; and| that other activities are carried out, such as those described in section
1118 of the ESEA (Parental Involvement). [Section 9101(32), ESEA.]
A-2. What is the significance of the statutory definition?
The definition of parental involvement sets the parameters, in conjunction with
other sections of the law by which SEAs, LEAs and schools will implement
programs, activities, and procedures to involve parents in Title I, Part A programs.
A-3. Who is a parent for the purposes of Title I, Part A?
The term ?parent? includes in addition to a natural parent, a legal guardian or other
person standing in loco parentis (such as a grandparent or stepparent with whom
the child lives, or a person who is legally responsible for the child?s welfare).
[Section 9101(31), ESEA.]
A-4. Why is parental involvement important?
A synthesis of the research concluded that ?the evidence is consistent, positive, and
convincing: families have a major influence on their children?s achievement in
school and through life. When schools, families, and community groups work
together to support learning, children tend to do better in school, stay in school
longer, and like school more.?4
4 Henderson, Anne. T. and Mapp, Karen L., A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and
Community Connections on Student Achievement, 2002, p.7
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A-5. What does the research show about how family involvement in children?s
education affects student achievement?
Studies have found that students with involved parents, no matter what their income
or background, are more likely to?| Earn high grades and test scores, and enroll in higher-level programs;| Pass their classes, earn credits, and be promoted;| Attend school regularly; and| Graduate and go on to postsecondary education.5
A-6. What are the key Title I, Part A parental notice requirements?
The key parental notice requirements for SEAs, LEAs, and schools are set forth in
Appendix B to this guidance.
A-7. What are the parental involvement provisions in section 1118 of the ESEA?
Title I, Part A provides for substantive parental involvement at every level of the
program, such as in the development and implementation of the State and local
plan, and in carrying out the LEA and school improvement provisions. Section
1118 contains the primary Title I, Part A requirements for SEAs, LEAs, and schools
related to involving parents in their children?s education. It is this section that
identifies critical points in the process of improving teaching and learning where
parents and the community can intervene and assist in school improvement.
Although section 1118 is extensive in scope and has many requirements for LEAs
and schools, the intent is not to be burdensome. These provisions reflect good
practice in engaging families in helping to educate their children, because students
do better when parents are actively involved in the education process, both at home
and at school.
A-8. How must SEAs, LEAs, and schools communicate with parents in general?
Because regular communication is the foundation of effective parental involvement,
SEAs, LEAs, and schools must provide information to parents of students
participating in Title I, Part A programs in an understandable and uniform format,
including alternative formats upon request, and, ?to the extent practicable,? in a
language that parents can understand. (See, for example, a State?s notification to
parents of LEA improvement status (section 1116(c)(6)), a school?s notification to
parents of the written parental involvement policy (section 1118(b)(1)), and LEA
and school notifications to parents of information related to parent programs,
meetings, and other activities (section 1118(e)(5).) [Title I, Part A Final Regulations, 34
CFR Section 200.36 (?Title I Regulations?)
5 Ibid.
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A-9. What is meant by providing information to parents with limited English
proficiency, ?to the extent practicable,? in a language parents can understand?
This means that, whenever practicable, written translations of printed information
must be provided to parents with limited English proficiency in a language they
understand. However, if written translations are not practicable, it is practicable to
provide information to limited English proficient parents orally in a language that
they understand. SEAs and LEAs have flexibility in determining what mix of oral
and written translation services may be necessary and reasonable for communicating
the required information to parents with limited English proficiency. [Title I, Part A
Final Regulations, 67 Fed. Reg. 71749 ? 50, Comments and Discussion on Section 200.36; available
at ED?s website at http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/finrule/2002-4/120202a.html.]
This requirement is consistent with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title
VI), as amended, and its implementing regulations. Under those regulations,
recipients of Federal financial assistance have a responsibility to ensure meaningful
access to their programs and activities by persons with limited English proficiency.
It is also consistent with ED policy under Title VI and Executive Order 13166
(Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency). The
Department of Justice?s Guidance on Title VI and E.O. 13166, which provides
clarification on how to determine an appropriate mix of language services, may be
found in the Federal Register, 67 Fed. Reg. 41455-41472 (June 18, 2002), or online
at http://www.lep.gov.
A-10. How must an SEA, LEA, or school communicate with parents with disabilities
to ensure meaningful participation in Title I, Part A programs?
SEAs, LEAs, and schools must take the necessary steps to ensure that
communications with parents with disabilities are as effective as communications
with other parents. Those steps include that SEAs, LEAs, and schools must furnish
appropriate auxiliary aids and services when necessary to afford a parent with a
disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, Title I,
Part A programs, services, and activities, including the parental involvement
provisions.
SEAs, LEAs, and schools must provide an opportunity to parents with disabilities to
request the auxiliary aids and services of their choice (such as sign language
interpreters and large print or materials in Braille) to ensure meaningful
participation in the different types of programs or activities carried out to
implement the Part A provisions. The SEA, LEA, or school must give primary
consideration to the expressed choice of a parent with disabilities by honoring that
choice, unless the SEA, LEA, or school can demonstrate that another effective
means of communication exists, or that use of the means chosen by the parent
would result in a fundamental alteration in the service, program, or activity or in an
undue financial and administrative burden. [28 CFR Sections 35.104 and 35.160-164, and
Appendix A to Part 35 of Title 28T of the Code of Federal Regulations implementing subtitle A of
title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990)]
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A-11. What Federal civil rights provisions are applicable to parental involvement
activities?
In implementing parental involvement programs, activities, and procedures, States,
LEAs and schools may not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin,
sex, disability, or age, consistent with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title
IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and the Age
Discrimination Act of 1975.
A-12. May an SEA or LEA use funds from other Federal programs for activities
related to parental involvement?
A number of ESEA programs allow the use of funds for parental involvement
activities. Examples of such programs include Reading First, the Even Start Family
Literacy Program, Comprehensive School Reform, and 21st Century Community
Learning Centers. Subject to the rules and requirements of the program, those funds
can be coordinated with the Title I, Part A funds that an SEA or LEA uses to meet
its parental involvement responsibilities.
An SEA or LEA also may find the new transferability authority added by the NCLB
useful in maximizing available funds for parental involvement activities under
programs subject to that authority. Subject to specific requirements, that authority
allows SEAs and LEAs to transfer a certain amount of funds among some
programs, such as into Title V, Part A (?Innovative Programs?) to address local
educational needs and priorities. [For more detailed information, see the
Transferability Authority Non-Regulatory Guidance on line at
http://www.ed.gov/programs/transferability/guidance.doc.]
A-13. What are Parental Information and Resource Centers?
Parental Information and Resource Centers, authorized by subpart 16 of Part D of
Title V of the ESEA, are school-linked or school-based centers established by
nonprofit organizations and consortia of nonprofit organizations and LEAs under
competitive grants from ED. These Parental Information and Resource Centers
provide comprehensive training, information, and support to parents, individuals
who work with parents, SEAs, LEAs, and other organizations that carry out
parental education and family involvement programs. In awarding grants under this
program, the Department has given priority to centers that make parents aware of,
and help them take advantage of, the public school choice and supplemental
educational services provisions of Title I, Part A. To contact a center see:
http://www.pirc-info.net. [Section 5561 ? 5566, ESEA.]
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A-14. What other resources and research are available to help improve parental
involvement?
Contact ED?s Information Resource Center for information on ED programs,
resources, and events at 1-800-USA-LEARN. Specific activities and resources
include:| Education News Parents Can Use, a television series about ways to
ensure children?s educational success. The third Tuesday of each month
during the school year, Education News provides parents with the tools
and information they need to be effectively involved in their children?s
learning. [For information on how to register visit the following URL
and go to FAQs: http://www.ed.gov/news/av/video/edtv/index.html.]| EDPubs, the Department?s Publication Center has a multitude of free
materials and resources that can assist SEAs, LEAs, schools, parents,
communities, and organizations in encouraging and maximizing parental
involvement. [EDPubs can be reached directly by calling 1-877-4EDPUBS
(433-7827). Order documents on-line at edpubs@inet.ed.gov.]| The Achiever, a biweekly electronic newsletter that provides
information, events and announcements about No Child Left Behind.
For other newsletters and journals from ED visit:
http://www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/index.html| The No Child Left Behind website at:
http://www.nochildleftbehind.gov/| The ?What Works Clearinghouse? (WWC), a project to help education
decision-makers answer such questions as how do we create better
schools and how can we make sure that all children can read? A part of
the Department?s Institute of Education Sciences, the WWC has been
established to put solid evidence from high-quality scientific research
into the hands of educators, policy-makers and the public so they may
make better choices about programs and practices. To receive e-mail
updates, subscribe to WWCUpdate on the Web at www.w-w-c.org. or
call 1-866-WWC-9799.| National Center for Family and Community Connections with
Schools, funded through the Southwest Regional Educational
Laboratory (SEDL) by the Department?s Institute of Education Sciences,
bridges research and practice to remove barriers to student achievement.
The Center links people with research-based information and resources
that they can use to effectively connect schools, families, and
communities. The Center reviews emerging findings and research to
develop an online database, annual conferences and annual reports to
help advance procedural knowledge and provides training and
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networking across the regional educational laboratory system to link
research findings to practice. [For more information visit
http://www.sedl.org/connections/about.html.]
B. RESPONSIBILITIES OF STATES
General SEA Responsibilities for Parental Involvement
B-1. What parental involvement provisions are included in State plans?
SEAs must support the collection and dissemination of effective parental
involvement practices to its LEAs and schools. Those practices must be based on
the most current research, meeting the highest professional and technical standards,
on effective parental involvement that fosters achievement to high standards for all
children. In addition, those practices must be geared toward lowering barriers to
greater participation by parents in school planning, review, and improvement
experiences. [Section 1111(d), ESEA.] [See Appendix C for a sample of researchbased
resources on parental involvement.]
In addition, each SEA must assure that it will provide technical assistance that is
designed to improve teaching and learning to LEAs and schools including technical
assistance relating to parental involvement under section 1118. [Section 1111(c)(4),
ESEA.]
B-2. Must an SEA consult with parents in the development of the State plan?
Yes. An SEA must consult with parents, along with others, such as LEAs, in
developing its State plan. [Section 1111(a)(1), ESEA.]
B-3. What responsibility does an SEA have with respect to the parental
involvement provisions in local plans?
An SEA must review each LEA?s plan to determine if the LEA?s parental
involvement activities meet the requirements of section 1118. [Section 1112(e)(3),
ESEA.]
B-4. May an SEA use the Title I, Part A funds it reserves for State administration
to meet its parental involvement responsibilities?
Yes, this is permitted. [Section 1004, ESEA.]
Information Dissemination and Technical Assistance
B-5. What information about LEA and school performance must an SEA
disseminate to parents?
State report cards must include information related to assessments, accountability,
and teacher quality, and must include data from all LEAs in the State. A
description of each of the data elements (assessments, accountability, teacher
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quality) for State report cards is included in the Report Cards, Title I, Part A Non-
Regulatory Guidance available at:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/reportcardsguidance.doc.] The information
in the report cards must be in an understandable and uniform format, including
alternative formats upon request, and, ?to the extent practicable,? in a language that
parents understand. [Section 1111(h)(1)(B)(ii), ESEA.]
B-6. What information about individual student academic assessment must SEAs
provide to parents?
A central requirement of the NCLB Act is that SEAs, in consultation with LEAs,
must implement a set of high-quality, yearly student academic assessments that
include, at a minimum, academic assessments in mathematics, reading or language
arts, and (beginning with school year 2007-08) science. As a part of this
assessment system, SEAs must produce individual student interpretive, descriptive,
and diagnostic reports that allow parents, teachers, and principals to understand and
address the specific academic needs of each student, and that include information
regarding achievement on academic assessments aligned with each State?s
academic achievement standards. SEAs must provide these reports to parents,
teachers, and principals of all public schools as soon as possible after the
assessments are given. The information must be provided to parents in an
understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon request (see
A-8 and A-10) and, to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can
understand (see A-9 and A-10). [Section 1111(b)(3)(C)(xii), ESEA.]
Progress Reviews
B-7. What are an SEA?s responsibilities for reviewing and disseminating
information about the progress of an LEA?s parental involvement activities?
As a part of its annual yearly progress (AYP) review of each LEA receiving Title I,
Part A funds, the SEA must determine if each LEA is, among other things, carrying
out its responsibilities under section 1118 with respect to parental involvement.
[Section 1116(c)(1)(A), ESEA.]
The SEA must publicize and disseminate the results of this review to its LEAs,
teachers and other staff, parents, students, and the community. [Section 1116(c)(1)(B),
ESEA.]
SEA Notification to Parents of Children in an LEA or School Identified for
Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring
B-8. How must an SEA, LEA or school communicate with parents during the
school improvement process?
Throughout the school improvement process, the appropriate entity--the SEA, LEA,
or school--must communicate with the parents of each child attending a school
identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring in a manner
Parental Involvement Guidance
10
consistent with the requirements described in A-8, A-9, and A-10. The information
must be provided to parents directly, by such means as regular mail or e-mail. If
the SEA does not have access to individual student addresses, it may provide the
information to the LEAs or schools for distribution to parents.
The SEA, LEA, or school must also provide information to parents during the
school improvement process by broader means of dissemination such as the
Internet, media, or public agencies that serve the student population and their
families. All communications must respect the privacy of students and their
families. [Section 200.36 of the Title I Regulations and Section 1116, ESEA.]
B-9. What are an SEA?s responsibilities regarding notification to parents of
children in an LEA identified for improvement or corrective action?
An SEA must promptly notify the parents of each student enrolled in a school
served by an LEA that the LEA has been identified for improvement or corrective
action. The notice must include information about: the results of the SEA?s annual
progress review of schools served by the LEA in meeting the State?s student
academic achievement standards; whether the LEA is carrying out its
responsibilities for sections 1116, 1117, 1118, and 1119; the reasons for the
identification; and how parents can participate in upgrading the quality of the LEA.
[Section 1116 (c)(1) and (6), ESEA.]
In the case of an LEA identified for corrective action, the SEA must publish and
disseminate to parents and the public information on corrective actions taken by the
SEA. [Section 1116(c)(10)(E), ESEA.]
SEA Technical Assistance to an LEA or School in Need of Improvement
B-10. What technical assistance related to parental involvement must an SEA
provide for LEAs and schools in need of improvement?
For each LEA that the SEA identifies for improvement, the SEA must provide
technical or other assistance, if requested, to better enable the LEA to develop and
implement the LEA?s plan and work with schools needing improvement. This
technical assistance must be provided by the SEA or an entity authorized by the
SEA, and must be supported by effective methods and instructional strategies from
scientifically based research (SBR). This technical assistance must address
problems, if any, in implementing the parental involvement activities in section
1118. [Section 1116(c)(9), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
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C. LEA RESPONSIBILITIES
General
C-1. Are the parental involvement provisions in section 1118 of the ESEA
applicable to LEAs?
Yes. An LEA may receive funds under Title I, Part A only if the LEA implements
programs, activities, and procedures for the involvement of parents in Title I, Part A
programs that are consistent with the requirements of section 1118. LEAs must
plan and implement these programs, activities, and procedures with meaningful
consultation with parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs.
[Section 1118(a), ESEA.]
C-2. What is the basic parental involvement requirement under Title I, Part A for
LEAs?
Each LEA that receives Title I, Part A funds must develop a written parental
involvement policy that establishes the LEA?s expectations for parental
involvement. The policy must be developed jointly with, and agreed upon with, the
parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs and distributed to
parents of all children participating in Title I, Part A programs. [Section 1118(a)(2),
ESEA.]
If the LEA already has a district-level parental involvement policy that applies to all
parents, the LEA may amend that existing policy, if necessary, to meet the
requirements of section 1118. [Section 1118(b)(3), ESEA.]
C-3. What specific information must an LEA?s written parental involvement policy
contain?
An LEA?s written parental involvement policy must establish the LEA?s
expectations for parental involvement, and describe how the LEA will?| Involve parents in jointly developing the LEA?s local plan under section
1112 and in the process of school review and improvement under
section 1116;| Provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other support
necessary to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and implementing
effective parental involvement activities to improve student academic
achievement and school performance;| Build the schools? and parents? capacity for strong parental involvement;| Coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies under Title I,
Part A with parental involvement strategies under other programs, such
as Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as
Parental Involvement Guidance
12
Teachers, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters
(HIPPY), State-run preschool programs, and Title III language
instructional programs;| Conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the
content and effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in
improving the academic quality of the schools served with Title I, Part A
funds, including?
o Identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in parental
involvement activities, with particular attention to parents who are
economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English
proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic
minority background;
o Using the findings of the evaluation to design strategies for more
effective parental involvement;
o Revising, if necessary, the LEA?s parental involvement policies; and| Involve parents in the activities of schools served under Title I, Part A.
[Section 1118(a)(2), ESEA.] [For more detailed information see Appendix D
for a sample template of a District wide Parental Involvement Policy.]
C-4. What is the relationship between the local plan an LEA submits to its SEA and
the LEA?s written parental involvement policy?
An LEA must incorporate its written parental involvement policy (developed in
accordance with section 1118) into its local plan (developed under section 1112 of
the ESEA), which is submitted to its SEA. [Section 1118(a)(2), ESEA.] If the LEA?s plan
is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, the LEA must submit any
parent comments, along with the LEA?s plan, to the SEA. [Section 1118(b)(4), ESEA.]
C-5. What other information related to parents must an LEA include in its local
plan under section 1112?
An LEA must describe in its local plan (developed under section 1112 of the
ESEA) how the LEA will coordinate its Title I, Part A program with programs
under Title II of the ESEA to provide professional development to teachers and
principals, and, if appropriate, to parents and other staff. [Section 1112(b)(1)(D), ESEA.]
C-6. What information must LEAs provide parents about the teachers and
paraprofessionals who work with their children?
At the beginning of each school year, LEAs must inform parents of each student
attending a Title I, Part A school of their right to request information about the
professional qualifications of both the teachers and the paraprofessionals who teach
and work with their children in an understandable and uniform format, including
Parental Involvement Guidance
13
alternative formats upon request, and, ?to the extent practicable,? in a language that
parents understand. [See A-8, A-9 and A-10 for additional information on
communicating with parents; Appendix B for a list of the key notification
requirements; and for information on paraprofessionals in Title I, Part A programs,
see the Title I Paraprofessionals Non-Regulatory Guidance at:
http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/paraguidance.pdf.] (Section 1111(h)(6) and (C),
ESEA, Sections 200.61 (a)(1) and (2) of the Title I Regulations.)
C-7. What information must LEAs provide to parents in the LEA report card
about the performance of their child?s school to assist parents in making
decisions about their children?s education?
Similar to State report cards, LEA report cards must include information related to
the data elements (assessment, accountability, and teacher quality) as it applies to
the LEA as a whole and as it applies to each school served by the LEA. Individual
school report cards are not required, but information about each school must be
included in the LEA report card. Example charts with all the required assessment
data elements at the LEA and school level are provided in Tables 4 and 5 of the
Report Cards, Title I, Part A Non-Regulatory Guidance available at:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/reportcardsguidance.doc.] The information
in the report cards must be in an understandable and uniform format, including
alternative formats upon request, and, ?to the extent practicable,? in a language that
parents understand. [Section 1111(h)(2) and (E), ESEA.]
C-8. What information must all LEAs receiving Title I, Part A funds provide to
parents of limited English proficient students?
LEAs receiving Title I, Part A funds must implement effective means of outreach to
parents of limited English proficient students to inform those parents of how the
parents ?| can be involved in the education of their children; and| be active participants in assisting their children to attain English
proficiency, achieve at high levels in core academic subjects, and meet the
challenging State academic achievement standards and State academic
content standards expected of all students.
LEAs? outreach to parents of limited English proficient students must include
sending notice of opportunities for, and holding, regular meetings for the purpose
of formulating and responding to recommendations from parents of Title I, Part A
students. [Section 1112(g)(4), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
14
C-9. What notice and information must LEAs with Title I, Part A-funded language
instruction educational programs provide to parents of limited English
proficient students?
LEAs using Title I, Part A funds to provide a language instruction educational
program (as defined in Part C of Title III of the ESEA) must provide the following
information to a parent or parents of limited English proficient children identified
for participation or participating in such a program:| the reasons for the identification of their child as limited English
proficient and in need of placement in a language instruction educational
program;| the child?s level of English proficiency, how that level was assessed, and
the status of the child?s academic achievement;| the methods of instruction used in the program in which their child is, or
will be participating, and the methods of instruction used in other
available programs, including how those programs differ in content,
instructional goals, and the use of English and a native language in
instruction;| how the program in which their child is or will be participating will meet
the educational strengths and needs of their child;| how the program will specifically help their child learn English, and
meet age-appropriate academic achievement standards for grade
promotion and graduation;| the specific exit requirements of the program, including the expected
rate of transition from the program into classrooms that are not tailored
for limited English proficient children, and the expected rate of
graduation from secondary school for the program if Title I, Part A
funds are used for children in secondary schools;| in the case of a child with a disability, how the program meets the
objectives of the child?s individualized education program (IEP) under
the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the child?s
individualized services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 (section 504);| information pertaining to parental rights, including written guidance?
o detailing the option that parents have a right to decline
enrollment in a language instructional program and to choose
another program or method of instruction if available,
Parental Involvement Guidance
15
o detailing the right that parents have to remove their child
immediately from the program upon the parents? request, and
o assisting parents in selecting among various programs and
methods of instruction, if more than one program or method is
offered by the eligible entity.| These notice requirements also apply to a language instruction
educational program funded under Part A of Title III. [Section 3303, ESEA.]| The notice and information provided must be in an understandable and
uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language
that the parents can understand. [Section 1112(g)(2), ESEA]
LEAs must provide the above information to parents not later than 30 days after the
beginning of the school year for those children identified before the beginning of
the school year as limited English proficient. For children identified after the
beginning of the school year as limited English proficient, LEAs must provide the
above information to parents within the first 2 weeks of the child being placed in a
language instruction educational program.
In addition, if a language instruction educational program has not made progress on
the annual measurable achievement objectives under section 3122 of the ESEA, the
eligible entity using the Title I, Part A funds must provide separate notification to
parents of a child identified for participation in, or participating in, that program to
inform them of that failure not later than 30 days after the failure occurs. [Section
1112(g)(1), (2), and (3), ESEA.]
C-10. What information must LEAs provide to parents of a child with a disability
who is in a language instruction educational program?
In the case of a child with a disability who is in a language instruction educational
program, parents must be notified, not later than 30 days after the beginning of the
school year, of how the language instruction educational program meets the
objectives of the child?s IEP under the IDEA or the child?s individualized services
under Section 504. [Section 1112(g)(1)(A)(i), ESEA.]
C-11. Do parents of private school children in Title I, Part A programs have the
right to equitable participation in parental involvement activities?
Yes. Under the equitable participation provisions of Title I, Part A, an LEA must
provide eligible children enrolled in private elementary and secondary schools, on
an equitable basis, special education services and other benefits under Title I, Part
A, including parental involvement services and activities, that are comparable to the
services and benefits provided to their public school counterparts. The amount of
funds available to provide equitable services from the applicable reserved funds
must be proportionate to the number of private school children from low-income
families residing in the participating public school attendance areas.
Parental Involvement Guidance
16
As part of complying with this requirement, an LEA must provide equitable
services to parents of private school participants from the funds set aside for this
purpose. Activities for the parents of private school participants must be planned
and implemented after meaningful consultation with private school officials and
parents and conducted either in conjunction with the LEA?s parental involvement
activities or independently. Activities that LEAs can provide parents that will assist
private school students in achieving high academic standards include a written
agreement between the LEA and parents of private school participants regarding the
responsibilities of the LEA and parents in the Title I program, parent meetings,
communication between the Title I teachers and parents on students? academic
progress, parent-teacher conferences, and parent education. [Section 200.65(a)(2) of the
Title I Regulations and Section 1120, ESEA.]
C-12. What responsibilities do LEAs have to parents with respect to complaint
procedures relating to violations of Title I, Part A requirements?
SEAs must adopt written procedures, consistent with State law, for receiving and
resolving any complaint from an organization or individual that the SEA, LEA or
other agency, or consortium of agencies, is violating a Federal statute or regulation
that applies to the Title I, Part A program, such as the school accountability or
parental involvement provisions. The SEA?s procedures must contain a
requirement that LEAs disseminate, free of charge, adequate information about the
complaint procedures to parents of students, and appropriate private school officials
or representatives. [General Provisions Regulations, at 34 CFR Sections 299.10 ? 299.12.]
LEA Funding for Parental Involvement
C-13. What funds must an LEA reserve for parental involvement activities under
section 1118?
An LEA that receives a Title I, Part A allocation of greater than $500,000 must
reserve not less than one percent of its Title I, Part A allocation to carry out the
provisions of section 1118, including promoting family literacy and parenting skills.
The percentage reserved for parental involvement must be calculated on the basis of
the LEA?s total Title I, Part A allocation. [Section 1118(a)(3)(A), ESEA.]
C-14. Do the parental involvement requirements of section 1118 apply to LEAs with
a Title I, Part A allocation of $500,000 or less?
Yes. LEAs with a Title I, Part A allocation of $500,000 or less must carry out the
provisions of section 1118, but are not required to reserve any specific amount from
their Title I, Part A allocation to do so. [Section 1118(a)(3), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
17
C-15. How does an LEA determine the amount of funds to be used for parental
involvement activities for parents of private school children participating in
Title I, Part A activities?
An LEA must reserve funds for parental involvement activities for parents of
private school children who participate in Title I, Part A activities from the amount
the LEA has reserved for parental involvement. These funds must be reserved by
the LEA before any allocation of funds to its respective school attendance areas and
schools. The amount of funds reserved for these activities must be proportionate to
the number of private school children from low-income families residing in
participating public school attendance areas. [Sections 200.65 and 200.77 of the Title I
Regulations.]
EXAMPLE OF EQUITABLE SERVICES CALCULATION RELATED TO PARENTAL
INVOLVEMENT FOR FAMILIES OF PRIVATE SCHOOL CHILDREN
An LEA reserves one and a half percent ($90,000) of its Title I allocation of $6,000,000 for
parental involvement activities. (Note that this is more than the required minimum of one
percent.) The number of public and private school children from low-income families
residing in participating Title I attendance areas is 25,000. Five percent of the 25,000
children attend private schools; thus five percent of the $90,000 reservation, or $4,500, is
available for parental involvement activities for parents of private school participants. The
parental involvement program funded by Title I must meet the needs of the parents of
private school participants. After consultation with the appropriate private school officials,
the LEA may conduct these activities independently or in conjunction with the LEA?s
regular parental involvement activities.
C-16. What amount of funds must an LEA allot to schools for parental involvement
activities under section 1118?
An LEA with an allocation in excess of $500,000 first must determine the
percentage of its Title I allocation that it wishes to reserve for parental involvement
activities under section 1118. That percentage must be at least one percent of the
LEA?s Title I allocation, and may be more. The LEA then must set aside an
amount for parental involvement of parents of private school children, based on the
proportion of private school children from low-income families residing in Title I
attendance areas, as explained in C-15 and the example following C-15. The LEA
then must distribute to its public schools at least 95 percent of the remainder,
leaving the balance of the reserved funds for parental involvement activities at the
LEA level. [See C-17 for a discussion of how the LEA may allocate the funds
among its public schools.] [Section 1118(a)(3)(C), ESEA.]
EXAMPLE: CALCULATION OF LEA?S DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS TO SCHOOLS
FOR PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT ACTIVITIES:
Parental Involvement Guidance
18
LEA?s total Title I allocation $6,000,000
Parental involvement reservation (1%)
(.01 x $6,000,000) $ 60,000
(.05 (percentage of private school children) Private school
set-aside for parents x $60,000 (amount LEA reserved
for parental involvement)) $ 3,000
Amount remaining ($60,000 - $3,000) $ 57,000
Public school distribution (95% (required minimum
distribution percentage) x $57,000) $ 54,150
Balance available for LEA-level parental
involvement activities ($57,000 - $54,150) $ 2,850
.
C-17. On what basis may an LEA distribute to schools served under Title I, Part A,
the funds it has reserved for schools to carry out the parental involvement
provisions of section 1118?
In distributing the amount of funds the LEA reserves for schools to carry out the
parental involvement provisions of section 1118, an LEA may use the same formula
it uses to determine the per-pupil allocations for those schools or it may distribute
those funds in another manner. An LEA may use any one of or a combination of
factors; for example, it may choose to allocate funds to schools in improvement
status; base its allocation on the results of the LEA?s annual evaluation of parental
involvement activities; or make use of the SEA?s annual adequate yearly progress
review of how its LEAs are carrying out their responsibilities for activities under
section 1118.
C-18. What input do parents have in how an LEA allots to schools the funds the LEA
has reserved for parental involvement?
The LEA must involve parents of Title I, Part A participating children in decisions
about how it allots to schools the funds the LEA has reserved for parental
involvement activities. The involvement of parents should be in a manner
consistent with the definition of parental involvement (A-1). In terms of process
and representation, an LEA may choose to use its district-wide parent advisory
council (if it has chosen to establish one) to provide advice on this and other matters
relating to Title I, Part A programs. [Section 1118(a)(3)(B) and 1118(e)(12), ESEA.]
C-19. If an LEA reserves more than the required one percent of its Title I, Part A
funds for parental involvement, must 95 percent of the entire amount reserved
be distributed to schools served under Title I, Part A?
No. The LEA may retain for district-wide parental involvement activities the full
amount of any Title I, Part A funds reserved for that purpose in excess of the
required one percent. However, the requirement to allocate an equitable amount for
Parental Involvement Guidance
19
the involvement of private school parents (as described in C-15) applies to the
entire amount set-aside. [Section 1118(a)(3)(C), ESEA.]
LEA Responsibilities for School Improvement
C-20. In reviewing annually the progress of each school, what must an LEA
communicate to parents, teachers, principals, schools, and the community?
An LEA must publicize and disseminate the results of its local annual review of
each school (i.e., the review used to determine whether the school is making AYP)
to parents, teachers, principals, schools, and the community so that they can
continually refine the instructional program, in an instructionally useful manner, to
help all children in Title I, Part A programs meet the challenging State student
academic achievement standards.
In addition, an LEA must review and publicize the effectiveness of the actions and
activities its schools are carrying out in Title I, Part A programs with respect to
parental involvement, professional development, and other activities assisted under
Title I, Part A. [Section 1116(a(1)(D),ESEA.]
C-21. What is an LEA responsible for communicating to parents of the children of a
school identified for school improvement, for corrective action, or for
restructuring?
If an LEA identifies a school for improvement, for corrective action, or for
restructuring, the LEA must, promptly following identification, provide a notice to
a parent or parents of each student enrolled in the school, in a manner consistent
with A-8 and A-9, that?| explains what the identification means, and how the school compares
academically to other schools served by the LEA and the SEA involved;| identifies the reasons for the identification;| provides an explanation of how the parents can become involved in
addressing the academic issues that caused the school to be identified for
school improvement; and| explains the parent?s option to transfer his or her child to another public
school, with transportation provided by the LEA, or to obtain
supplemental educational services for the child. [Section 1116(b)(6), ESEA.]
The notification must provide parents with enough relevant information to help
them decide what is best for their child. The LEA?| must inform parents about the academic achievement of students at the
school or schools to which their child may transfer;
Parental Involvement Guidance
20| may choose to include a description of the special academic programs,
and facilities, and before- or after-school programs available at those
schools;| may include the professional qualifications of teachers in the core
academic subjects, and| may identify parental involvement opportunities. [Section 200.37(b), Title I
Regulations.]
Because an LEA must provide choice to students in eligible schools not later than
the first day of the school year, notice to parents should occur well before that date.
C-22. What information about actions taken to address problems that led to a
school?s identification for school improvement, for corrective action, or for
restructuring must an LEA provide to both parents and the public?
In addition to providing school improvement information (see C-21) to the parents
of each student in the school, an LEA must publish and disseminate, to both parents
and the public, information explaining?| what the school is doing to address the problem of low achievement;| what the LEA or the SEA is doing to help the school address the
problem; and| if applicable, a description of specific corrective actions or restructuring
plans. [Section 1116(b)(6), ESEA, and Section 200.38, Title I Regulations.]
C-23. What opportunities do the principal and parents of a school have to present
evidence if they believe that the elementary or secondary school proposed for
identification for improvement, for corrective action, or for restructuring has
been identified in error?
If the principal or a majority of parents of the students enrolled in the school believe
that the school has been proposed for identification for school improvement,
corrective action, or restructuring in error because of statistical or other substantive
reasons, the principal may provide supporting evidence to the LEA for
consideration prior to a final determination. The LEA must make a final public
determination of the status of the school with respect to identification not later than
30 days after it has provided the school with an opportunity to review the schoollevel
data. [Section 1116(b)(2), ESEA.]
C-24. What responsibility does an LEA have regarding the school improvement plan
of an identified school?
An LEA must approve the plan, which the school must develop or revise after the
school has been identified for improvement. The school plan must be developed or
Parental Involvement Guidance
21
revised in consultation with parents, school staff, along with the LEA serving the
school, and outside experts not later than 3 months after the school is identified and
must cover a 2-year period. [Section 1116(b)(3), ESEA.]
C-25. What responsibility does an LEA have for providing technical assistance
related to parental involvement to a school identified for school improvement?
An LEA is responsible for ensuring that technical assistance is provided during the
entire two-year period to each school identified for school improvement as the
school develops and implements its improvement, and that the technical assistance
is based on scientifically-based research (SBR). The LEA must provide specific
technical assistance that includes help with analyzing data from the assessments,
and other examples of student work, to identify and address problems in instruction,
and problems, if any, in implementing the parental involvement requirements in
section 1118 and the professional development requirements in section 1119.
[Section 1116(b)(4), ESEA.]
C-26. What responsibilities to parents does an LEA have with respect to
supplemental educational services?
If a Title I school is identified for improvement, or corrective action, or for
restructuring, the LEA serving that school must arrange to provide supplemental
educational services to eligible children in the school. The provider of
supplemental educational services must have a demonstrated record of
effectiveness, and be selected by the child?s parent from a list of providers as
retained by the SEA in accordance with reasonable criteria that the SEA has
adopted. An LEA must:| provide, at a minimum, annual notice to parents (in an understandable
and uniform format, including alternative formats upon request, and, to
the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand) of: (1)
the availability of the supplemental educational services; (2) the identity
of the approved providers that are within the LEA or whose services are
reasonably available in neighboring LEAs; and (3) a brief description of
the services, qualifications, and demonstrated effectiveness of each
provider;| if requested, assist parents in choosing a provider from the list;| apply fair and equitable procedures for selecting students to be served if
the number of spaces at approved providers is not sufficient;| not disclose to the public the identity of any student who is eligible for,
or receiving, supplemental educational services without the written
permission of the parents of the student. [Section 1116(e)(2), ESEA.] [For
additional information see the Supplemental Educational Services Non-
Parental Involvement Guidance
22
Regulatory Guidance at:
http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/suppsvcsguid.pdf]
C-27. What responsibilities does an LEA have to parents of the children in a school
that is in the restructuring phase of school improvement?
If an LEA identifies a school for restructuring, which means a major reorganization
of the school?s governance arrangement, the LEA must provide both parents and
teachers with?| Prompt notice;| An opportunity to comment before any action under the restructuring
plan takes place; and| An opportunity to participate in the development of any restructuring
plans. [Section 1116(b)(8)(C, ESEA); Section 200.43, Title I Regulations.]
D. SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES
School-level Parental Involvement Policies and Funding
D-1. What written parental involvement policies must Title I, Part A schools
develop?
Each school must develop, jointly with parents of children participating in Title I,
Part A services, a written school parental involvement policy that describes how the
school will carry out the parental involvement requirements in section 1118(c) ? (f),
including the development of a school-parent compact. If the school already has a
parental involvement policy that applies to all parents, the school may amend that
existing policy, if necessary, to meet the requirements of section 1118(b). Schools
must update these policies periodically to meet the changing needs of parents and
the school. [See Appendix D for a sample template of a District-Wide Parental
Involvement Policy.] [Section 1118(b), ESEA.]
D-2. What notification and dissemination requirements apply for school parental
involvement policies?
Each school served under Title I, Part A must notify parents of its written parental
involvement policy in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative
formats upon request, and, to the extent practicable, provide notice and the policy in
a language the parents can understand. In addition, each school must make its
written parental involvement policy available to the local community. [For further
information on required notices, see Appendix B and see A-8, A-9 and A-10 for
additional information about language requirements and alternative formats.]
[Section 1118(b)(1),ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
23
D-3. What information do the parents? ?right-to-know? provisions require schools
to provide parents about the qualifications of teachers of their children who
are not highly qualified?
Title I, Part A schools must give each parent timely notice when their child has
been assigned, or has been taught for four or more consecutive weeks, by a teacher
who is not highly qualified. [Section 1111(h)(6)(B)(ii), ESEA.] The term ?highly
qualified? for this purpose is defined in section 200.56 of the Title I regulations (67
Fed. Reg. 71730, December 2, 2002), available at:
http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/finrule/2002-4/120202a.html.]
D-4. How must schools involve parents to improve Title I, Part A programs?
Schools served under Title I, Part A must involve parents, in an organized, ongoing,
and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I, Part A
programs, including?| The planning, review, and improvement of the school parental
involvement policy; and| The joint development of any schoolwide program plan under section
1114(b)(2). [Section 1118(c)(3), ESEA.]
If a school already has in place a process for involving parents in the joint planning
and design of the school?s programs, the school may use that process so long as it
includes an adequate representation of parents of children participating in Title I,
Part A programs. [Section 1118(c)(3), ESEA.]
D-5. What meetings must schools hold to inform parents about Title I, Part A
programs and parental involvement?
Each school served under Title I, Part A must convene an annual meeting, at a time
convenient for parents to inform them of their school?s participation in Title I, Part
A programs, and to explain the Title I, Part A requirements and the right of parents
to be involved in those programs. In order to keep parents informed, schools must
invite to this meeting all parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs
and encourage them to attend. Schools must offer a flexible number of additional
parental involvement meetings, such as in the morning or evening so that as many
parents as possible are able to attend. [Section 1118(c)(1) and (2), ESEA.]
D-6. What information and opportunities must schools provide parents of children
participating in Title I, Part A programs?
Schools served under Title I, Part A must provide to parents of participating
children, in a timely manner, information about the programs funded by Title I, Part
A. That information must include?| A description and explanation of the school?s curriculum;
Parental Involvement Guidance
24| Information on the forms of academic assessment used to measure
student progress; and| Information on the proficiency levels students are expected to meet.
Upon the request of parents, schools must provide?| Opportunities for regular meetings for parents to formulate suggestions
and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions about the education of
their children.
The school must respond to any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible.
[Section 1118(c)(4), ESEA.]
D-7. Which parents are eligible to participate in parent involvement activities in a
schoolwide program school?
The purpose of a schoolwide program is to improve academic achievement
throughout a high-poverty school (one in which at least 40% of the students are
from low-income families) so that all students, but particularly the lowestachieving
students, demonstrate proficiency related to the State?s academic
standards. [Section 200.25(a), Title I Regulations.] In other words, a schoolwide program
is an alternative to a targeted assistance program under Title I to raise the
achievement of the lowest-achieving students.
Parent involvement is very important in a schoolwide program. In fact, one of the
components of a schoolwide program requires the school to employ strategies to
increase parental involvement. [Section 1114(b)(1)(F), ESEA.] Consistent with the
purpose stated above, all parents in a schoolwide program school are eligible to
participate in parent involvement activities. However, given that the focus of a
schoolwide program is to raise the achievement of the lowest-achieving students, a
schoolwide program school should ensure that its parent involvement activities
include the parents of the lowest-achieving students in order that they may better
assist in the education of their child.
Shared Responsibility for High Student Academic Achievement
D-8. What is a "school-parent"compact?
Each Title I, Part A school must jointly develop, with the parents of children served
under Title I, Part A, a school-parent compact as a component of its written parental
involvement policy. A school-parent compact is a written agreement between the
school and the parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs that
identifies the activities that the parents, the entire school staff, and the students will
undertake to share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement.
In addition, the school-parent compact outlines the activities that the parents, school
staff, and students will undertake to build and develop a partnership to help the
Parental Involvement Guidance
25
children achieve to the State?s high academic standards. [Section 1118(d)], ESEA.] [See
Appendix E for a sample template of a school-parent compact.]
D-9. What must a ?school-parent? compact include?
The school-parent compact must describe?
1. The school?s responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and
instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables
children served under Title I, Part A to meet the State?s student academic
achievement standards;
2. Ways in which parents will be responsible for supporting their children?s
learning (for example, monitoring attendance, homework completion, or
television watching; volunteering in their child?s classroom; and
participating as appropriate in decisions relating to the education of their
children and positive use of extracurricular time); and
3. The importance of communication between teachers and parents on an
ongoing basis through, at a minimum?| Parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least annually,
during which the compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual
child?s achievement;| Frequent reports to parents on their child?s progress; and| Reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in
their child?s class, and observation of classroom activities. [Section
1118(d), ESEA.] [See Appendix E for a sample template of a school-parent
compact.]
D-10. What information must a school provide to parents about their child?s level of
achievement on the State academic assessment?
Each year a school that receives Title I, Part A funds must provide parents with an
individual student report informing them on their child?s level of achievement on
the State?s assessments in at least reading/language arts, and math. [Section
1111(h)(6)(B)(i), ESEA.] This report may be covered by the SEA reports on individual
student academic assessments described in B-6.
Schools in Improvement, Corrective Action, or Restructuring
D-11. Must an LEA pay for or provide transportation to service providers?
No. An LEA may provide transportation to service providers, but is not required to
do so under the law. In addition, the costs of such transportation may not be used
to satisfy the 5 percent minimum expenditure requirement for supplemental
Parental Involvement Guidance
26
educational services. Also, the costs of transportation may not be counted toward
satisfying an LEA?s obligation to spend up to an amount equal to 20 percent of its
Title I, Part A allocation on choice-related transportation and supplemental
educational services. [For more information see the Supplemental Educational
Services Non-Regulatory Guidance at:
http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/suppsvcsguid.pdf.]
E. LEA AND SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES TO BUILD PARENT CAPACITY
Basic Requirement
E-1. How do LEAs and schools build parents? capacity for involvement?
Each school and LEA receiving assistance under Title I, Part A must ensure
effective involvement of parents and support a partnership among the school, the
parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement through
training, information, and coordination activities. [Section 1118(e), ESEA.]
Providing Assistance and Training
E-2. On what topics must schools and LEAs provide parents with assistance and
training?
It is the responsibility of schools and LEAs to help parents understand topics that
will help them become equal partners with educators in improving their children?s
academic achievement. Schools and LEAs must help parents understand such
things as?| The State?s academic content standards and State student academic
achievement standards;| State and local academic assessments, including alternative assessments;| The parental involvement requirements of section 1118; and| How to monitor their child?s progress and work with educators to
improve the achievement of their child. [Section 1118(e)(1), ESEA.]
E-3. Does the LEA, with the assistance of its SEA, have a responsibility to upgrade
the educational levels of parents of participating students, particularly those
parents who do not possess a secondary school diploma?
SEAs must encourage an LEA and its schools receiving Title I, Part A funds to
offer family literacy services (using Title I, Part A funds) if the LEA or school
determines that a substantial number of Title I, Part A students have parents who do
not have a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent or who have low
levels of literacy. [Section 1111(c)(14), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
27
Title I, Part A funds can be used to support the full range of family literacy
activities, including parenting education and educational services for adults who
need improved literacy skills in order to support their children?s learning, if the
LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for those
activities. [Section 1118(e)(7), ESEA.]
E-4. What assistance do schools and LEAs provide to help parents work with their
children?
Schools and LEAs must provide materials and training to help parents work with
their children to improve their children?s achievement such as literacy training for
parents, if necessary, and using technology to foster parental involvement. Other
examples of activities that might be provided include:| literacy programs that bond families around reading and using the public
library;| providing information about the essential components of reading
instruction to enable parents to support the instructional practices used
by the teacher;| training parents in the use of the Internet to enable them to access their
children?s homework; communicate with teachers; and review
information posted about schools in improvement, supplemental
educational services, public school choice and other opportunities to
promote student achievement. [Section 1118(e)(2), ESEA.]
E-5. Is volunteering in a child?s classroom an activity in which parents can engage
to help share the responsibility for student learning?
Yes. Volunteering and observing in their child?s classroom is an important activity
for parents? shared responsibility for high student academic achievement and is also
one that helps both the school and parents build and develop a partnership to help
children achieve the State?s high standards. [Section 1118(d)(1), ESEA.]
E-6. What school staff training must schools and LEAs provide related to parental
involvement?
Schools and LEAs must educate their staffs in how to work with parents as equal
partners. Specifically, with the assistance of parents, schools and LEAs must
educate teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and other staff in the value
and utility of the contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, communicate
with, and work with parents, implement and coordinate parent programs, and build
ties between parents and the school. Schools and LEAs may involve parents in
developing this training, in order to improve its effectiveness. [Section 1118(e)(3) and
(6), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
28
Activities to Strengthen Parental Involvement
E-7. How can schools and LEAs maximize parental involvement and participation
in school meetings, conferences, and activities?
Schools may pay reasonable and necessary expenses associated with local parental
involvement activities, including transportation and childcare costs, to enable
parents to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions. Schools and
LEAs should also arrange school meetings at a variety of times. In addition, for
parents who are unable to attend conferences at school, schools may arrange for and
conduct in-home conferences between teachers or other educators who work
directly with participating children and the children?s parents. Schools also may
provide training to parents in how to enhance the involvement of other parents.
[Section 1118(e)(8), (9), and (10), ESEA.]
E-8. May Title I, Part A funds be used to support parents? attendance at workshops
and conferences?
The Department strongly encourages parents to attend local or regionally based
training opportunities, such as workshops or conferences, when they are the same or
similar as those being held out-of-State. Upon return from any workshop or
conference that is not available to all other interested parents, attendees should
provide information and, if possible, training on the conference topics to other
parents of children enrolled in Title I, Part A programs. Title I, Part A funds may
be used for costs that are reasonable and necessary to support the attendance of
parents of participating children at these workshops and conferences to enable them
to participate more effectively in the local program or to conduct home-based
educational activities. Paying travel and other costs associated with attendance at
out-of-State conferences and workshops may be allowable in some special cases.
E-9. May a school or all schools within a district use their share(s) of the one
percent reservation for parental involvement under section 1118(a)(3)(C) to
support a district-level parent resource center or some other district-level
activity for parents?
The law is clear that 95 percent of the one percent of Title I, Part A allocation the
LEA reserves for parental involvement under section 1118 must be distributed
among the district?s schools, and that the parents of those schools must be involved
both in deciding how those funds will be allotted and, once allotted, how they will
be spent. Parents of children receiving Title I, Part A services and school officials
may decide at the school level to pool their individual resources to pay for districtlevel
parental involvement activities, such as a parent resource center.
Parental Involvement Guidance
29
Coordination with Other Programs and Community Involvement
E-10. How should schools and LEAs coordinate and conduct parental involvement
activities?
To the extent feasible and appropriate, schools and LEAs must coordinate and
integrate parental involvement programs and activities with the following
programs:| Head Start| Reading First| Early Reading First| Even Start Family Literacy Programs| Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters| Parents as Teachers| Public preschools| Other relevant programs such as Title III language instructional
programs. [Sections 1112(b) (1), and (E), 1118(a)(D), ESEA.]
In addition, to the extent feasible, schools and LEAs must conduct other activities,
such as forming parent resource centers, that encourage and support parents in
becoming more involved in their children?s education. [Section 1118(e)(4), ESEA.]
E-11. How can schools and LEAs involve the community to help ensure the effective
involvement of parents?
The Department encourages schools and LEAs to develop appropriate roles for
community-based organizations, including faith-based organizations, and
businesses in parental involvement activities. These organizations should form
partnerships among the school involved, the parents, and the community to improve
student academic achievement. [Section 1118(e)(13), ESEA.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
30
Appendix A: Definitions
ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS
?Adequate yearly progress? (AYP) is defined by the State in a manner that?
(1) Applies the same high standards of academic achievement to all public school
students in the State;
(2) Is statistically valid and reliable;
(3) Results in continuous and substantial academic improvement for all students;
(4) Measures the progress of all public schools, LEAs, and the State based
primarily on the State?s academic assessment system under section 200.2;
(5) Measures progress separately for reading/ language arts and mathematics;
(6) Is the same for all public schools and LEAs in the State; and
(7) Consistent with section 200.7, applies the same annual measurable objectives
under section 200.18 separately to each of the following:
i. All public school students.
ii. Students in each of the following subgroups:
(A) Economically disadvantaged students;
(B) Students from major racial and ethnic groups;
(C) Students with disabilities; and
(D) Students with limited English proficiency, as defined in
section 9101(25) of the ESEA. [Section 200.13(b) of the Title I
Regulations.]
CORRECTIVE ACTION
?Corrective action? means action by an LEA that?
(1) Substantially and directly responds to?
(i) The consistent academic failure of a school that led the LEA to
identify the school for corrective action; and
Parental Involvement Guidance
31
(ii) Any underlying staffing, curriculum, or other problems in the
school;
(2) Is designed to increase substantially the likelihood that each group of students
described in section 200.13(b)(7) of the Title I regulations and enrolled in the
school will meet or exceed the State?s proficient levels of achievement as
measured by the State assessment system; and
(3) Is consistent with State law. [Section 200.42(a), Title I Regulations.]
LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
The term ?language instruction educational program? means an instruction course?
(1) In which a limited English proficient child is placed for the purpose of developing
and attaining English proficiency, while meeting challenging State academic
content and student academic achievement standards, as required by section
1111(b)(1) of the ESEA; and
(2) That may make instructional use of both English and a child?s native language to
enable the child to develop and attain English proficiency, and may include the
participation of English proficient children if such course is designed to enable all
participating children to become proficient in English and a second language.
[Section 3301(8), ESEA.]
LEA IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT
An ?LEA in need of improvement? is an LEA that, for two consecutive years, did not make
adequately yearly progress (AYP) as defined in the State?s plan under section 1111(b)(2) of
the ESEA. [Section 1116(c)(3), ESEA.]
PARENT
The term ?parent? includes a legal guardian or other person standing in loco parentis (such
as a grandparent or stepparent with whom the child lives, or a person who is legally
responsible for the child?s welfare). [Section 9101(31), ESEA.]
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
The term ?parental involvement? means the participation of parents in regular, two-way,
meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school
activities, including ensuring ?| That parents play an integral role in assisting their child?s learning;| That parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child?s education at
school;
Parental Involvement Guidance
32| That parents are full partners in their child?s education and are included, as
appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the
education of their child; and| The carrying out of other activities, such as those described in section 1118 of the
ESEA. [Section 9101(32), ESEA.]
PUBLIC SCHOOL CHOICE
In the case of a school identified for school improvement, the school district will, not later
than the first day of the school year following identification, provide all students enrolled
in the school with the option to transfer to another public school served by the school
district, which may be a public charter school, that has not been identified for school
improvement, unless this option is prohibited by State law. [Section 1116(b)(1)(E), ESEA.]
Priority must be given to the lowest-achieving children from low-income families in
providing students the option to transfer to another public school. [Section 1116(b)(1)(E)(ii),
ESEA.]
RESTRUCTURING
?Restructuring? means a major reorganization of a school?s governance arrangement by an
LEA that?
(1) Makes fundamental reforms, such as significant changes in the school?s staffing and
governance, to improve student academic achievement in the school;
(2) Has substantial promise of enabling the school to make AYP as defined under
Section 200.13 through 200.20 of the Title I Regulations; and
(3) Is consistent with State law. [Section 200.43(a) of the Title I Regulations.]
SCIENTIFICALLY BASED RESEARCH (SBR)
The term ?scientifically-based research??| Means research that involves the application of rigorous, systematic, and objective
procedures to obtain reliable and valid knowledge relevant to education activities
and programs; and| Includes research that?
o Employs systematic, empirical methods that draw on observation or
experiment;
o Involves rigorous data analyses that are adequate to test the stated
hypotheses and justify the general conclusions drawn;
Parental Involvement Guidance
33
o Relies on measurements or observational methods that provide
reliable and valid data across evaluators and observers, across
multiple measurements and observations, and across studies by the
same or different investigators;
o Is evaluated using experimental or quasi-experimental designs in
which individuals, entities, programs, or activities are assigned to
different conditions and with appropriate controls to evaluate the
effects of the condition of interest, with a preference for random-
assignment, experiments, or other designs to the extent that those
designs contain within-condition or across ?condition controls;
o Ensures that experimental studies are presented in sufficient detail
and clarity to allow for replication, or, at a minimum, offer the
opportunity to build systematically on their findings; and
o Has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal or approved by a
panel of independent experts through a comparably rigorous,
objective, and scientific review. [Section 9101(38), ESEA.]
SCHOOL IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT
A ?school in need of improvement? means an elementary school or secondary school that
has not made adequate yearly progress (AYP) for two consecutive years.
SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
The term ?supplemental educational services? means tutoring and other supplemental
academic enrichment services that are?| In addition to instruction provided during the school day;| Specifically designed to?
o Increase the academic achievement of eligible students as
measured by the State?s assessment system; and
o Enable these children to attain proficiency in meeting State
academic achievement standards; and| Of high quality and research-based. [Section 200.45(a) of the Title I Regulations.]
Parental Involvement Guidance
34
Appendix B: Key Title I, Part A Parental Notice Requirements
By whom
Key Title I, Part A
Parental Notice Requirements*
When
SEAs
LEAs
Schools
Annual report cards (SEAs and LEAs
disseminate to parents, schools, and the
public, an annual report card with aggregate
information, including student achievement
(disaggregated by category), graduation rates,
performance of LEAs, teacher qualifications,
and other required information). [Section
1111(h)(1) and (2), ESEA.] Guidance, B-5 (SEA) and
C-7 (LEA).
Annually
!
!
Individual student assessment reports
(SEAs, in consultation with LEAs, provide to
parents, teachers, and principals of students
in all schools individual student interpretive,
descriptive, and diagnostic reports, which
allow specific academic needs to be
understood and addressed, and include
information on the student?s achievement on
academic assessments aligned with State
academic achievement standards). [Section
1111(b)(3)(C)(xii), ESEA.]
As soon as
practicable
after the
assessment is
given
!
Progress review (SEAs disseminate to
parents, LEAs, teachers and other staff,
students, and the community the results of the
SEA?s yearly progress review of each LEA
(including progress in carrying out parental
involvement responsibilities); LEAs
disseminate to parents, teachers, principals,
schools, and the community the results of the
LEA?s yearly progress review of each
school). [Section 1116(a)(1)(C), (c)(1)(B) and
(c)(6), ESEA.] Guidance, B-7 (SEA) and C-20 (LEA)
Annually
!
!
LEAs identified for improvement (SEAs
notify parents of children enrolled in schools
in the LEA that the LEA has been identified
for improvement and other information).
Promptly upon
identification
!
Parental Involvement Guidance
35
By whom
Key Title I, Part A
Parental Notice Requirements*
When
SEAs
LEAs
Schools
[Section 1116(c)(1) and (6), ESEA.] Guidance, B-8.
LEAs identified for corrective action
(SEAs disseminate to parents and public
information on corrective actions taken by
SEA). [Section 1116(c)(10)(E), ESEA.] Guidance,
B-9.
!
Schools identified for school improvement,
corrective action, or restructuring (LEAs
provide to parents of each student an
explanation of what the identification means,
how the schools compare to others, reasons
for the identification, the LEA?s and school?s
response, how parents can become involved,
any corrective action taken, the parental
choice and supplemental services options as
applicable, restructuring, and other
information). [Section 1116(b)(6), 7(E), and 8(C),
ESEA, and 34 CFR 200.37(5).] Guidance, C-21, C-
22, and C-23.
Promptly
following
identification
!
Schools identified for corrective action ?
supplemental services notice (LEAs serving
schools that fail to make adequate yearly
progress (AYP) by the end of the first full
school year after being identified for
improvement provide notice to parents of the
availability of supplemental services, the
identity of the providers, a description of the
services, and other information). [Section
1116(e)(2), ESEA.]
Annually (at a
minimum)
!
Schools identified for restructuring (LEAs
serving schools that fail to make AYP after 1
full school year of corrective action provide
prompt notice to teachers and parents and
provide opportunity to comment and
participate in preparing a restructuring plan).
[Section 1116(b)(8)(C), ESEA.] Guidance, C-27.
Promptly after
school misses
AYP
following 1
full school
year of being
in corrective
action
!
Written parental involvement policies
(LEAs notify parents of Title I, Part A
Determined by
!
!
Parental Involvement Guidance
36
By whom
Key Title I, Part A
Parental Notice Requirements*
When
SEAs
LEAs
Schools
children of district-level written parental
involvement policy; schools notify parents
and community of school?s written parental
involvement policy). [Section 1118(a)(2) and
(b)(1), ESEA.] Guidance, C-3 and C?4 (LEA), and D-
1 (school).
LEA (LEA
policy)
(school
policy)
Written SEA complaint procedures (LEAs
disseminate free of charge to parents of
students, and to appropriate private school
officials or representatives, adequate
information about the SEA?s written
complaint procedures for resolving issues of
violation(s) of a Federal statute or regulation
that applies to Title I, Part A programs). [34
CFR Section 200.11(d).]
Determined by
SEA
!
Parents? right to know ? teacher and
paraprofessional qualifications (LEAs
inform parents of Title I, Part A students that
parents may request, and the LEA then will
provide, certain information on the
professional qualifications of the student?s
classroom teachers and paraprofessionals
providing services to the child). [Section
1111(h)(6)(A), ESEA.] Guidance, C-6.
Annually, at
beginning of
school year
!
Parents? right to know ? student
achievement (schools provide to each
individual parent information on the level of
achievement of the parent?s child in each of
the State academic assessments). [Section
1111(h)(6)(B)(i), ESEA.] Guidance, D-10. NOTE:
This requirement may be covered by the
SEA?s individual student assessment report
indicated above.
Determined by
LEA.
!
Parents? right to know - non-highly
qualified teachers (schools provide to each
individual parent timely notice that the
parent?s child has been assigned, or taught for
4 or more consecutive weeks by, a teacher
who is not highly qualified). [Section
1111(h)(6)(B)(ii), ESEA.] Guidance, D-3.
Timely
!
Parental Involvement Guidance
37
By whom
Key Title I, Part A
Parental Notice Requirements*
When
SEAs
LEAs
Schools
Title I, Part A meeting (schools invite
parents to an informational meeting to inform
them about the school?s participation in Title
I, Part A programs and explain the
requirements and their right to be involved).
[Section 1118(c)(1) and (2), ESEA.] Guidance, D-5.
Annual
!
Title I, Part A information (schools provide
to parents of participating children specific
information about Title I, Part A programs,
and opportunity to request regular meetings).
[Section 1118(c)(4), ESEA.] Guidance, D-6.
Timely
!
Limited English proficient students -
general (LEAs implement effective outreach
to inform parents of limited English
proficient children of how those parents can
be involved in their children?s education and
active participants in helping their children
attain English proficiency, high achievement
levels in core academic subjects, and meet
State standards, including notice of
opportunities for and holding regular
meetings). [Section 1112(g)(4), ESEA] Guidance,
C-9.
Regular
(meetings)
!
Limited English proficient students -
language instruction educational programs
(LEAs inform parents of limited English
proficient children identified for participation
or participating in a Title I, Part A-funded
language instruction educational program
under Title III of the ESEA, of: reasons for
the identification, level of English
proficiency, methods of instruction, how the
program will help the child, and other
information; LEAs inform parents of a child
with a disability how the language instruction
educational program meets the objectives of
the child?s individualized educational
program (IEP)). [Section 1112(g)(1)(A) and (3),
ESEA.] Guidance, C-9 and C-10.
Annually, not
later than 30
days after the
beginning of
school year for
children ID?d
before
beginning of
year;
otherwise
within first 2
weeks of child
being placed
in language
instruction
program.
!
Parental Involvement Guidance
38
By whom
Key Title I, Part A
Parental Notice Requirements*
When
SEAs
LEAs
Schools
Limited English proficient students -
insufficient language instruction
educational programs (eligible entity using
Title I, Part A funds for a language
instruction educational program under Title
III of the ESEA provides separate notice to
parents of a child identified for participation
in, or participating in, the program to inform
them that the program has not made progress
on the annual measurable achievement
objectives). [Section 1112(g)(1)(B), ESEA.]
Not later than
30 days after
the failure
occurs
!
(or other
eligible
entity)
Students with the most significant
cognitive disabilities (a State that measures
the achievement of students with the most
significant cognitive disabilities based on
alternate achievement standards must ensure
that parents are informed that their child?s
achievement will be based on these alternate
standards. The SEA must also ensure that
parents are informed of the actual
achievement levels of these students,
particularly in the case of an LEA that
exceeds the 1% cap on counting proficient
scores for AYP). [Section 1111(b)(3), ESEA, and
34 CFR Section 200.6(a)(2)(iii)(A)(2),
200.13(c)(4)(v)]
Determined by
SEA
!
*This table includes key Title I, Part A statutory and regulatory requirements for
notice or information given or disseminated to parents of students participating in
Title I, Part A programs. It is not intended to be an exhaustive list, and does not
include consultation, collaboration, technical assistance, training, or other types of
requirements. Except where otherwise indicated, the terms ?LEAs? and ?schools?
Parental Involvement Guidance
39
refer to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools with programs funded under
Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).
Parental Involvement Guidance
40
Appendix C: Research Based Resources
The following resources represent a sample of the research-based resources available
on parental involvement. This list is not exhaustive. The U.S. Department of
Education is providing the list of resources below for the reader?s convenience, and no
official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education is intended or should be
inferred. The views expressed by the authors are their own, and do not necessarily
represent the policies of the Federal government or the U.S. Department of
Education.
* Southwest Educational Development Laboratory. (2003) Diversity and School,
Family, and Community Connections. Austin, Texas.
This synthesis reviews research findings from 64 studies that address some aspect
of diversity as it relates to student achievement and school, family, and community
connections. It describes the procedures used to select the studies and a brief
overview of the broad concepts related to diversity and family involvement that the
studies address. The author lists the studies and publication date, categorizing them
according to the research method used, populations addressed, and educational level
addressed. A brief description is provided of the principal limitations of the studies.
The primary audience is practitioner leaders ? superintendents, principals,
curriculum supervisors, lead teachers, family involvement staff, community leaders,
and others who may be responsible for or interested in helping to shape local policy
or practice regarding school, family, and community connections. The report is
organized so that, depending on their needs and interests, local leaders may quickly
access practical information, or may explore the topic in depth.
*Henderson, Anne, T., and Mapp, Karen, L. (2002) A New Wave Of Evidence: The
Impact Of School, Family And Community Connections On Student Achievement.
Austin, Texas: National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools.
This review examines the growing evidence that family and community
connections with schools make a difference in student success. The authors look at
51 recent studies - all but two published between 1995 and 2002, covering a range
of perspectives and approaches. The studies, some of which are based on scientific
research, fall in three broad categories: 1) studies on the impact of family and
community involvement on student achievement; 2) studies on effective strategies
to connect schools, families, and communities; and 3) studies on parent and
community organizing efforts to improve schools.
Mattingley, D.J, Prislin, R., McKenzie, T.L., Rodriquez, J.L., and Kayzar, B. (2002)
Evaluating Evaluations: The Case Of Parental involvement Programs. Review of
Educational Research, 72(4), 549-576.
The authors analyzed 41 studies that evaluated K-12 parental involvement programs
in order to assess claims that such programs are an effective means of improving
Parental Involvement Guidance
41
student learning. The authors found that the majority of existing evidence
regarding the links between parental involvement and student achievement comes
from correlation studies rather than rigorous, systematic evaluations of the impact
programs have on student learning (p.550). Of the 41 studies, the authors found
only four that used the most rigorous research design. Two of these studies found
significantly improved performance on standardized achievement tests among
children whose parents participated in the intervention program; two found no
significant effects. All four of the studies addressed minority and/or low-income
populations. Each focused on training parents or older siblings to help tutor
students or to help with homework. The two programs also extended the duration
of parent training over a longer period than the two showing no significant effect.
The authors also noted that the majority of intervention programs they reviewed
focused on changing parent behavior ? especially in the areas of parenting and
supporting home learning ? rather than on changing teacher practices or school
structures.
Program Evaluation
*Starkey, P. and Klein, A. (2000) Fostering Parental Support For Children?s
Mathematical Development: An Intervention With Head Start Families. Early
Education and Development, 11( 5), 659-680.
This article describes two experimental studies of a four-month program that
engaged about 30 families to develop math skills in Head Start children, ages 4-5
years. Another 30 families were assigned to control groups. At two sites in the San
Francisco area, one serving African American families and the other Latino
families, staff gave classes for mothers and children and loaned math activity kits
for use at home. The program supported math knowledge, not literacy. Control
group families did not attend classes or have access to the library. In both
programs, the researchers found that parents were willing and able to work with
their children on math when given training and materials. The children in the
program developed greater math knowledge and skills than the control group
children. The authors believe that the two key factors in the programs? success
were the work of parent liaisons and the provision of math kits to families to use at
home.
Family Involvement At Home To Support Student Achievement
Armbruster, B., Lehr, F., Osborn, J.B. (2003) Proven Ideas from Research for Parents:
A Child Becomes A Reader (K-3). Second Edition. Portsmouth, New Hampshire:
RMC Research Corporation.
This booklet contains a short summary of what scientific research says about how
children learn to read and write; things that parents and other caregivers can do to
enable a child to become a successful reader and writer at three different grade
levels; a list of helpful terms; and ideas for books and organizations that may be of
interest to parents and other caregivers. The publication was funded through a grant
Parental Involvement Guidance
42
from the National Institute for Literacy, an independent federal organization that
supports the development of high-quality State, regional and national literacy
services.
The Partnership for Reading, U.S. Department of Education. (2001) Put Reading
First: Helping Your Child Learn to Read (A Parent Guide, Preschool through Grade
3.
This brochure was published by the Partnership for Reading, a collaborative effort
of the National Institute for Literacy (NIFL), the National Institute of Child Health
and Human Department (NICHD), and the U.S. Department of Education to make
evidence-based reading research available to educators, parents, policymakers and
others with an interest in helping all people learn to read well.
Family-School Connections To Support Student Achievement
Hiatt-Michael, D.B. (Ed). (2001) Promising Practices for Family Involvement in
Schools. Greenwich, Connecticut: Information Age Publishing
This first volume in Family School Community Partnership provides educators and
practitioners with promising practices, theories, and research that are designed to
bring families and schools together. It contains major frameworks for
understanding family involvement and government support of family involvement
projects. The chapter authors present a theoretical base for understanding school,
family, and community partnerships and research that supports promising practices.
The sponsor of this series is the Executive Board and membership of the Family,
School, Community Partnership Special Interest Group of the American
Educational Research Association.
*Shaver, A.V., and Walls, R.T. (1998) Effect Of Title I Parental involvement On
Student Reading And Mathematics Achievement. Journal of Research and
Development in Education, 31(2), 90-97.
This quasi-experimental study examines the effects of parental involvement on the
reading and math achievement of 335 Title I students in second through eighth
grades, and their parents. The students who participated in the study all were
receiving remedial help in reading and math. Information about their achievement
levels was based on pre- and post-tests on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills
(CTBS/4) in reading and math. The district developed a series of three-hour parent
workshops that involved information, training, and discussions. Each Title I teacher
was required to attend at least four of these sessions during the school year to
promote five types of involvement - 1) parenting; 2) parent-teacher communication;
3) parental involvement at school; 4) parental involvement at home; and 5) program
decision-making. The researchers found that students whose parents regularly
attended school-based parent workshops made greater gains in reading and math
than students with less-involved parents.
Parental Involvement Guidance
43
*Voorhis, V. and Frances, L. (2001) Interactive Science Homework: An Experiment In
Home And School Connections. National Association of Secondary School Principals,
Bulletin, 85(627), 20-32.
This article describes the results of a study on involving families in the homework
of their children using Teachers Involve Parents in Schoolwork (TIPS), an
interactive homework process. This study compared the effects of TIPS homework
with homework that has the same content, but is not interactive. Three sixth grade
classes and two eighth grade classes, totaling 253 students in all, participated for 18
weeks. The participants received weekly homework assignments with learning
goals. Only families with TIPS homework were told about how students would
involve them in their work. TIPS students earned significantly higher grades than
students who did not use interactive homework.
*Reynolds, A. J. (2001) Success in Early Intervention: The Chicago Child-Parent
Centers. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.
In this monograph, the author investigates the long-term effects of the Child-Parent
Center Program (CPC), a large-scale early childhood intervention program for
economically disadvantaged children. The program operates about 24 centers
through the Chicago public schools to children ages 3 to 9 and their families. The
central operating principle of the program is that direct parental involvement is
expected to enhance parent-child interactions, parent and child attachment to
school, and social support among parents, and consequently to promote children?s
school readiness and social adjustment. Programs for parents include a parent
resource room in each center and a parent resource teacher who [oversaw] parent
activities both within the center and with the community. Among other topics, this
study investigates family outcomes of program participation as secondary to child
outcomes.
Snow, C.E., Burns, S.M., & Griffin, P. (Eds.). (1998). Preventing Reading Difficulties
in Young Children. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
This book is a summary report developed from the findings of the Committee on
the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. It examines research
findings to provide an ?integrated picture of how reading develops and how reading
instruction should proceed (p.vi).? Of particular note is chapter 5 as it includes a
review of scientific research on parental and family influences on children?s
development of language and early reading skills. The text also includes a
discussion of the research on the importance of parents reading to their children and
presents research-based strategies for parents to use to gain maximum benefit from
parent-child book reading.
Parental Involvement Guidance
44
Reaching and Involving Diverse Parents
*Chrispeel, J.H. and Rivero, E. (2001) Engaging Latino Families For Student Success:
How Parent Education Can Reshape Parent?s Sense Of Place In The Education Of
Their Children. Peabody Journal of Education, 76(2), 119-169.
This study offers some areas for consideration by school staff wishing to initiate
parental involvement strategies to engage Latino families. It also provides
anecdotes that highlight some of the barriers to parental involvement. The study
examined the effect of a program intervention called the Parent Institute for Quality
Education (PIQE) on 198 immigrant parents? sense of place in their children?s
education. The most prevalent changes for participants were the increased number
of literacy activities, such as reading more and going to the library more frequently,
and the discovery that they could initiate contact with the school and not have to
wait for the teacher to extend a hand. The authors conclude that concepts about the
parents? roles, based on cultural traditions and prior experiences that limit the types
and levels of involvement can affect how parents interpret a school?s invitations and
opportunities to participate. They also demonstrate, however, that these roles are
not fixed and may be altered by information provided by a cultural-broker initiative
such as the PIQE.
*Desimone, L., Finn-Stevenson, M., and Henrich, C. (2000) Whole School Reform In
A Low-Income African American Community: The Effects Of The CoZi Model On
Teachers, Parents, And Students. Urban Education, 35(3), 269-323.
The purpose of this quasi-experimental evaluation is to measure the effects of the
CoZi model of school reform in a school serving primarily African American, lowincome
students. The CoZi model seeks to address the needs of preschool and
kindergarten children and their families by providing social services through the
school and a system for reorganizing school decision-making and service provision
to develop a cohesive community of parents, teachers, and students. There were
significantly higher parent and community participation rates in the CoZi school
than in a comparison school with similar staff and student demographics. The CoZi
school also reported more positive attitudes toward parental involvement and more
programs to bring parents into the school. In addition, the CoZi school also had a
significantly better school climate, especially as reported by teachers. This
evaluation gives a comprehensive analysis of a specific school reform approach that
emphasizes parental involvement and the impact that it had on school climate and
culture, parent and teacher satisfaction, and student achievement.
*For more information and inquiries about these studies, contact the National
Center for Family & Community Connections with Schools, Southwest Educational
Development Laboratory; 211 East Seventh Street (Second Floor); Austin, Texas
78701-3281; Phone: 800-476-6861; Fax: (512) 476-2286; Web:
www.sedl.org/connections/
Parental Involvement Guidance
45
Appendix D: District Wide Parental Involvement Policy
SAMPLE TEMPLATE*
NOTE: In support of strengthening student academic achievement, each local
educational agency (LEA or school district) that receives Title I, Part A funds must
develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a
written parental involvement policy that contains information required by section
1118(a)(2) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (district wide
parental involvement policy). The policy establishes the LEA?s expectations for parental
involvement and describes how the LEA will implement a number of specific parental
involvement activities, and is incorporated into the LEA?s plan submitted to the State
educational agency (SEA).
School districts, in consultation with parents, may use the sample template below as a
framework for the information to be included in their parental involvement policy.
School districts are not required to follow this sample template or framework, but if they
establish the district?s expectations for parental involvement and include all of the
components listed under ?Description of How District Will Implement Required District
wide Parental Involvement Policy Components? below, they will have incorporated the
information that section 1118(a)(2) requires be in the district wide parental involvement
policy. School districts, in consultation with parents, are encouraged to include other
relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective
parental involvement and strengthen student academic achievement.
* * * * *
PART I. GENERAL EXPECTATIONS (Sample Template)
[NOTE: Each district in its District-wide Parental Involvement Policy must establish the
district?s expectations for parental involvement. [Section 1118(a)(2), ESEA.] There is no
required format for those written expectations; however, this is a sample of what might be
included.]
The name of school district agrees to implement the
following statutory requirements:| The school district will put into operation programs, activities and
procedures for the involvement of parents in all of its schools with Title
I, Part A programs, consistent with section 1118 of the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Those programs, activities and
procedures will be planned and operated with meaningful consultation
with parents of participating children.
Parental Involvement Guidance
46| Consistent with section 1118, the school district will work with its
schools to ensure that the required school-level parental involvement
policies meet the requirements of section 1118(b) of the ESEA, and each
include, as a component, a school-parent compact consistent with
section 1118(d) of the ESEA.| The school district will incorporate this district wide parental
involvement policy into its LEA plan developed under section 1112 of
the ESEA.| In carrying out the Title I, Part A parental involvement requirements, to
the extent practicable, the school district and its schools will provide full
opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English
proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children,
including providing information and school reports required under
section 1111 of the ESEA in an understandable and uniform format and,
including alternative formats upon request, and, to the extent practicable,
in a language parents understand.| If the LEA plan for Title I, Part A, developed under section 1112 of the
ESEA, is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, the
school district will submit any parent comments with the plan when the
school district submits the plan to the State Department of Education.| The school district will involve the parents of children served in Title I,
Part A schools in decisions about how the 1 percent of Title I, Part A
funds reserved for parental involvement is spent, and will ensure that not
less than 95 percent of the one percent reserved goes directly to the
schools.| The school district will be governed by the following statutory definition
of parental involvement, and expects that its Title I schools will carry
out programs, activities and procedures in accordance with this
definition:
Parental involvement means the participation of parents in regular, twoway,
and meaningful communication involving student academic learning
and other school activities, including ensuring?
(A) that parents play an integral role in assisting their child?s
learning;
(B) that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their
child?s education at school;
(C) that parents are full partners in their child?s education and are
included, as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory
committees to assist in the education of their child;
Parental Involvement Guidance
47
(D) the carrying out of other activities, such as those described in
section 1118 of the ESEA.| [For States where a Parental Information and Resource Center is
established] The school district will inform parents and parental
organizations of the purpose and existence of the Parental Information
and Resource Center in the State.
PART II. DESCRIPTION OF HOW DISTRICT WILL IMPLEMENT
REQUIRED DISTRICT WIDE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
POLICY COMPONENTS (Sample Template)
[NOTE: The District wide Parental Involvement Policy must include a description of how
the district will implement or accomplish each of the following components. [Section
1118(a)(2), ESEA.] This is a ?sample template? as there is no required format for these
descriptions. However, regardless of the format the district chooses to use, a description of
each of the following components below must be included in order to satisfy statutory
requirements.]
1. The __name of school district________ will take the following actions to involve
parents in the joint development of its district wide parental involvement plan under
section 1112 of the ESEA:
(List actions.)
2. The __name of school district________ will take the following actions to involve
parents in the process of school review and improvement under section 1116 of the
ESEA:
(List actions.)
3. The name of school district will provide the following necessary coordination,
technical assistance, and other support to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and
implementing effective parental involvement activities to improve student academic
achievement and school performance:
(List activities.)
4. The name of school district will coordinate and integrate parental involvement
strategies in Part A with parental involvement strategies under the following other
programs: [Insert programs, such as: Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First,
Even Start, Parents As Teachers, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters,
and State-operated preschool programs], by:
Parental Involvement Guidance
48
(List activities.)
5. The _name of school district_ will take the following actions to conduct, with the
involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this
parental involvement policy in improving the quality of its Title I, Part A schools. The
evaluation will include identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in
parental involvement activities (with particular attention to parents who are
economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have
limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background). The school district
will use the findings of the evaluation about its parental involvement policy and
activities to design strategies for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if
necessary (and with the involvement of parents) its parental involvement policies.
(List actions, such as describing how the evaluation will be
conducted, identifying who will be responsible for conducting it, and
explaining what role parents will play)
1. The ___name of school district___________ will build the schools? and parent?s
capacity for strong parental involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of
parents and to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the
community to improve student academic achievement, through the following activities
specifically described below:
A. The school district will, with the assistance of its Title I, Part A schools, provide
assistance to parents of children served by the school district or school, as
appropriate, in understanding topics such as the following, by undertaking the
actions described in this paragraph --| the State?s academic content standards,| the State?s student academic achievement standards,| the State and local academic assessments including alternate
assessments,| the requirements of Part A,| how to monitor their child?s progress, and| how to work with educators:
(List activities, such as workshops, conferences, classes, both in-State and
out-of-State, including any equipment or other materials that may be
necessary to ensure success.)
B. The school district will, with the assistance of its schools, provide materials and
training to help parents work with their children to improve their children?s
academic achievement, such as literacy training, and using technology, as
appropriate, to foster parental involvement, by:
Parental Involvement Guidance
49
(List activities.)
C. The school district will, with the assistance of its schools and parents, educate
its teachers, pupil services personnel, principals and other staff, in how to reach
out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, in the value
and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to implement and coordinate
parent programs and build ties between parents and schools, by:
(List activities.)
D. The school district will, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and
integrate parental involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading
First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Home Instruction Programs for Preschool
Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public preschool and other
programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that
encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of
their children, by:
(List activities.)
E. The school district will take the following actions to ensure that information
related to the school and parent- programs, meetings, and other activities, is sent
to the parents of participating children in an understandable and uniform format,
including alternative formats upon request, and, to the extent practicable, in a
language the parents can understand:
(List actions.)
PART III. DISCRETIONARY DISTRICT WIDE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
POLICY COMPONENTS (Sample Template)
NOTE: The District wide Parental Involvement Policy may include additional paragraphs
listing and describing other discretionary activities that the school district, in consultation
with its parents, chooses to undertake to build parents? capacity for involvement in the
school and school system to support their children?s academic achievement, such as the
following discretionary activities listed under section 1118(e) of the ESEA:| involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and
other educators to improve the effectiveness of that training;| providing necessary literacy training for parents from Title I, Part A funds,
if the school district has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of
funding for that training;| paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parental
involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to
enable parents to participate in school-related meetings and training
sessions;
Parental Involvement Guidance
50| training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents;| in order to maximize parental involvement and participation in their
children?s education, arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or
conducting in-home conferences between teachers or other educators, who
work directly with participating children, with parents who are unable to
attend those conferences at school;| adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental
involvement;| establishing a district wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all
matters related to parental involvement in Title I, Part A programs;| developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and
businesses, including faith-based organizations, in parental involvement
activities; and| providing other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under
section 1118 as parents may request.]
* * * * *
PART IV. ADOPTION (Sample Template)
This District wide Parental Involvement Policy has been developed jointly with, and agreed
on with, parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs, as evidenced by
______________________.
This policy was adopted by the __name of school district __ on __mm/dd/yy______
and will be in effect for the period of _______. The school district will distribute this
policy to all parents of participating Title I, Part A children on or before
_________________.
_______________________________
(Signature of Authorized Official)
_______________________________
(Date)
*This sample template of a District Wide Parental Involvement Policy is not an official
U.S. Department of Education document. It is provided only as an example.
Parental Involvement Guidance
51
Appendix E: School-Parent Compact
SAMPLE TEMPLATE*
NOTE: Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a written school-parent compact jointly
with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A activities, services, and
programs. That compact is part of the school?s written parental involvement policy
developed by the school and parents under section 1118(b) of the ESEA. The compact
must outline how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the
responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the
school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the
State?s high standards.
Schools and parents may use the sample template below as a framework for the
information to be included in their school-parent compact. Schools and parents are not
required to follow this sample template or framework, but if they include all of the
bolded items listed under ?Required School-Parent Compact Provisions? below, they will
have incorporated all of the information required by section 1118(d) to be in the schoolparent
compact. Schools and parents, in consultation with students, are encouraged to
include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support
effective parental involvement and strengthen student academic achievement.
* * * * *
SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT
The name of school , and the parents of the students participating in activities,
services, and programs funded by Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary
Education Act (ESEA) (participating children), agree that this compact outlines how the
parents, the entire school staff, and the students will share the responsibility for improved
student academic achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build
and develop a partnership that will help children achieve the State?s high standards.
This school-parent compact is in effect during school year .
REQUIRED SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT PROVISIONS
(provisions bolded in this section are required to
be in the Title I, Part A school-parent compact)
Parental Involvement Guidance
52
School Responsibilities
The name of school will:
1. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective
learning environment that enables the participating children to meet the
State?s student academic achievement standards as follows:
[Describe how the school will provide high-quality curriculum and instruction,
and do so in a supportive and effective learning environment.]
2. Hold parent-teacher conferences (at least annually in elementary schools)
during which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual
child?s achievement. Specifically, those conferences will be held:
[Describe when the parent-teacher conferences will be held.]
3. Provide parents with frequent reports on their children?s progress.
Specifically, the school will provide reports as follows:
[Describe when and how the school will provide reports to parents.]
4. Provide parents reasonable access to staff. Specifically, staff will be available
for consultation with parents as follows:
[Describe when, where, and how staff will be available for consultation with
parents.]
5. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child?s
class, and to observe classroom activities, as follows:
[Describe when and how parents may volunteer, participate, and observe
classroom activities.]
Parent Responsibilities
We, as parents, will support our children?s learning in the following ways:
[Describe the ways in which parents will support their children?s learning, such as:| Monitoring attendance.| Making sure that homework is completed.| Monitoring amount of television their children watch.| Volunteering in my child?s classroom.| Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my children?s education.| Promoting positive use of my child?s extracurricular time.
Parental Involvement Guidance
53| Staying informed about my child?s education and communicating with the school
by promptly reading all notices from the school or the school district either
received by my child or by mail and responding, as appropriate.| Serving, to the extent possible, on policy advisory groups, such as being the Title I,
Part A parent representative on the school?s School Improvement Team, the Title I
Policy Advisory Committee, the District wide Policy Advisory Council, the State?s
Committee of Practitioners, the School Support Team or other school advisory or
policy groups.
"#
OPTIONAL ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS
Student Responsibilities (revise as appropriate to grade level)
We, as students, will share the responsibility to improve our academic achievement and
achieve the State?s high standards. Specifically, we will:
[Describe the ways in which students will support their academic achievement, such as:| Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need to.| Read at least 30 minutes every day outside of school time.| Give to my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices
and information received by me from my school every day.]
Additional Required School Responsibilities (requirements that schools must follow,
but optional as to being included in the school-parent compact)
The name of school will:
1. Involve parents in the planning, review, and improvement of the school?s
parental involvement policy, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way.
2. Involve parents in the joint development of any schoolwide program plan, in an
organized, ongoing, and timely way.
3. Hold an annual meeting to inform parents of the school?s participation in Title I,
Part A programs, and to explain the Title I, Part A requirements, and the right of
parents to be involved in Title I, Part A programs. The school will convene the
meeting at a convenient time to parents, and will offer a flexible number of
additional parental involvement meetings, such as in the morning or evening, so
that as many parents as possible are able to attend. The school will invite to this
meeting all parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs
(participating students), and will encourage them to attend.
Parental Involvement Guidance
54
4. Provide information to parents of participating students in an understandable
and uniform format, including alternative formats upon the request of parents
with disabilities, and, to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can
understand.
5. Provide to parents of participating children information in a timely manner
about Title I, Part A programs that includes a description and explanation of the
school?s curriculum, the forms of academic assessment used to measure
children?s progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet.
6. On the request of parents, provide opportunities for regular meetings for parents
to formulate suggestions, and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions about
the education of their children. The school will respond to any such suggestions
as soon as practicably possible.
7. Provide to each parent an individual student report about the performance of
their child on the State assessment in at least math, language arts and reading.
8. Provide each parent timely notice when their child has been assigned or has
been taught for four (4) or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not
highly qualified within the meaning of the term in section 200.56 of the Title I
Final Regulations (67 Fed. Reg. 71710, December 2, 2002).
Optional School Responsibilities
To help build and develop a partnership with parents to help their children achieve
the State?s high academic standards, the name of school will:
1. Recommend to the local educational agency (LEA), the names of parents of
participating children of Title I, Part A programs who are interested in serving
on the State?s Committee of Practitioners and School Support Teams.
2. Notify parents of the school?s participation in Early Reading First, Reading First
and Even Start Family Literacy Programs operating within the school, the
district and the contact information.
3. Work with the LEA in addressing problems, if any, in implementing parental
involvement activities in section 1118 of Title I, Part A.
4. Work with the LEA to ensure that a copy of the SEA?s written complaint
procedures for resolving any issue of violation(s) of a Federal statute or
regulation of Title I, Part A programs is provided to parents of students and to
appropriate private school officials or representatives.
Parental Involvement Guidance
55
__________________ __________________ _______________
School Parent(s) Student
__________________ __________________ _______________
Date Date Date
(PLEASE NOTE THAT SIGNATURES ARE NOT REQUIRED)
*This sample template of a School-Parent Compact is not an official U.S. Department
of Education document. It is provided only as an example.


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