JJIE.org Juvenile Justice Resource Hub Partner Outreach Materials

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JJIE hub image

Earlier this year, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE) launched a comprehensive Juvenile Justice Resource Hub that offers engaging stories, research and information on critical issues in juvenile justice. As a companion to the Hub, JJIE is publishing six series of in-depth articles. The first series spotlighted mental health, substance abuse and the juvenile justice system. This week, JJIE launched the next series of coverage, spotlighting community-based alternatives to incarcerating youth.

The Hub and content series are powerful resources for practitioners, reformers, researchers, policymakers, academics, journalists and anyone who cares about youth well-being. We hope you’ll help spread the word to your networks.

To make it easy to do so, JJIE.org and SparkAction have created sample social media posts,  site and eNewsletter language,  images,  a blog for reposting and other information to help you to alert your networks about this launch. Feel free to customize any of these.

For more information, please contact Alison Waldman at alison@sparkaction.org.  

Thanks for helping to spread the word about this valuable hub!

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Sample Social Media Posts

Below are sample posts to alert your social media networks on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Use these or write your own, using the suggested tags. Questions? Contact Alison Waldman at alison@sparkaction.org

TWITTER
 Twitter & LinkedIn Status Updates

Tags:  #jjresourcehub, @JJIEga, @ModelsForChange, #juvenilejustice

  • Mental health & community alternatives: Stop Googling & get all the info in @JJIEnews #jjresourcehub http://bit.ly/jjhub
     
  • Browse: Compelling stories & resources on community-based alternatives for #juvenilejustice  http://bit.ly/15geZEL #jjresourcehub
     
  • Tried & true lessons of community-based alternatives for #juvenilejustice from #GA http://bit.ly/17IWtXB
     
  • The next generation of #juvenilejusticej: programs serving youth in the community vs. locking them up http://bit.ly/15geZEL #jjresourcehub

FB
   Facebook & LinkedIn Discussion Boards

Tags:@Juvenile Justice Information Exchange, @National Juvenile Justice Network,  (Tip: Make sure you’ve “liked” both pages, then type @ and then begin to enter these tags and a drop-down menu will appear to select your tag.)

  • Get to your browser: @Juvenile Justice Information Exchange has compelling news, resources & commentary on reform trends of justice to serve your best work. Check out the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub’s reform categories including the brand new section on community-based alternatives. http://bit.ly/jjhub
     
  • @Juvenile Justice Information Exchange’s series of stories explores the trials & successes of community-based alternatives for youth offenders. Then follow pathways to layers of resources in their new Juvenile Justice Resource Hub. http://bit.ly/15geZEL

     

  • Advocates, researches & community leaders: Review these approaches to minimize youth contact with the juvenile justice system & cost-effective ways to improve outcomes for them while keeping communities safe. http://bit.ly/15geZEL

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Website & eNewsletter Language

Feel free to use this language for your website and eNewsletters, or write your own.

JJIE.org Juvenile Justice Hub Expands to Explore Community-Based Alternatives
Over the next few weeks, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange will produce a series of stories about programs designed to serve youth safely in the community instead of incarcerating them in jail-like facilities. Stories will touch on places like Newton County, Ga., a rural community whose juvenile court has embraced a number of innovative programs meant to keep kids out of the courtroom entirely, and programs like Save Our Streets, which tries to stop neighborhood violence before it happens. Check out this new section of the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub for these stories and more to come.

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Images & Multimedia

You may use these images to share on social media and in your posts. Click to enlarge and to download.

IAMGE 1

Please credit:   © Richard Ross, RichardRoss.net

 

                  

                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEOS

Use the embed code below to post it on your site or blog:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XiIj4ft0RrQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Use the embed code below to post it on your site or blog:

<iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Yih470UgFSg" width="400"></iframe>

 

 

 

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Blog for Reposting

This blog is available for reposting on your website or blog. Instructions for reprinting:

  • Please maintain all language verbatim and hyperlinks intact
     
  • Add the following notice on the top or bottom of your post:

This blog was originally published by SparkAction.org and is reprinted here with permission.

  • Email Alison Waldman at alison[at[sparkaction.org when you've reprinted.

Read the whole blog >>

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Additional information

About the Hub: The Juvenile Justice Resource Hub is a comprehensive source of information on cutting-edge juvenile justice issues and reform trends, developed in topic phases throughout the spring and summer of 2013 and continuing into 2014. It’s a project led by the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange in partnership with the National Juvenile Justice Network, with support from the MacArthur Foundation. Through the hub, you can find:

  • Ready access to reliable, accurate, curated information and analysis on juvenile justice issues.
  • Relevant research
  • Best practice models
  • Commentary from experts in the field
  • Policy levers for reform
  • Toolkits and action-oriented documents
  • Successful reforms.

Who’s Behind It:

JJIE logoThe Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (JJIE.org), based at Kennesaw State University
near Atlanta, Ga., is the only publication covering juvenile justice and related issues in the Southeast and around the nation on a consistent, daily basis. Focused not just on delivering information, but rather on an “exchange” of ideas, the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange fosters a community of support around the issues facing the youth of our country.

Kennesaw State University is the third-largest university in Georgia, offering 80 graduate and undergraduate degrees, including doctorates in education, business and nursing, and a new Ph.D. in international conflict management. A member of the University System of Georgia, Kennesaw State is a comprehensive, residential institution with a growing population of 24,600 students from more than 130 countries.

The Center for Sustainable Journalism's work is made possible, in part, by the generous funding of the Harnisch, Tow, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur, Annie E. Casey and Open Society foundations. In addition to the online Juvenile Justice Information Exchange (jjie.org), the Center also publishes online and print editions of Youth Today. Read more >>

NJJN logoThe National Juvenile Justice Network: Through education, community-building and leadership development, The National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN) enhances the capacity of juvenile justice coalitions and organizations to press for policies and practices that are equitable and appropriate for youth and families involved in, or at risk of becoming involved in, the justice system.  Read more >>

Mac-logo
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundationsupports creative people and institutions committed to building a more peaceful world. The Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservationand security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society.  Read more >>

MFC logModels for Change, a MacArthur Foundation initiative, supports a network of government and court officials, legal advocates, educators, community leaders, and families working together to ensure that kids who make mistakes are held accountable and treated fairly throughout the juvenile justice system.  Read more >>